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UPDATED: Prince William loses man in his 70s to COVID-19, health district adds 45 new cases | News

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The death of a Prince William County man in his 70s due to COVID-19 was reported Saturday, marking the sixth COVID-19 death reported locally since Tuesday, Oct. 13.

The Prince William Health District also reported 45 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday as well as three additional hospitalizations, including those of residents in their 20s, 30s and 70s, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Virginia reported 1,048 new cases as well as 51 new hospitalizations and 14 new deaths on Saturday. It’s the sixth time daily case numbers have exceeded 1,000 in the past week.

The local health district’s seven-day average percent-positivity rate held steady at 5.6%. Prince William continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia.

The county has so far lost 217 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 26 and Manassas Park, eight. The local death toll now stands at 251.

Victims include 145 men and 106 women; one was in their 20s, four were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 24 were in their 50s, 59 were in their 60s, 64 were in their 70s, and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There continue to be two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: The VDH reported 45 new cases in the health district but indicated 46 new cases in the breakdown of new cases by age group. (The discrepancy was not explained in the state report).

Of the 45 new cases reported in the health district, 42 were in Prince William County, one was in Manassas and two were in Manassas Park.

Local residents in their 30s reported the most new cases with 11.

Residents under 30 reported 20 or 44% of the 46 new cases reported by age group with kids age 9 and under reporting six; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting six; and residents in their 20s reporting eight.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 19 or 42% of the 46 new cases. Those in their 30s reported 11 new cases, while those in their 40s reported two and those in their 50s reported six.

Residents ages 60 and older reported seven or 15% of the 46 new cases, with five among those in their 60s, one among those in their 70s and one age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate held steady at 5.6% and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.4%, also unchanged from Friday, and then by Rappahannock Health District, which each reported a rate of 4.6%, down from 4.8% on Friday. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole held steady at 4.1%, while the statewide rate ticked up from 4.8% to 4.9%.

Hospitalizations: There were three new hospitalizations reported in the Prince William Health District on Saturday, including those of residents in their 20s, 30s and 70s.

There were 993 people hospitalized across the state on Saturday, down nine from Friday, with 219 in intensive care units, down three, and 100 on ventilators, down four.

About 23% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22192 posted the most new cases on Saturday with 11. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Codes 22191, which posted nine new cases and 22193, which posted eight.

As of Saturday, Oct. 17, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in eight of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while dropping in six ZIP Codes and remaining unchanged in six.

Among the ZIP Codes where the seven-day average number of new cases held steady, two are continuing to report zero new cases over the last several weeks ZIP Codes: 20143 (Catharpin) and 22125 (Occoquan).

Note: This report has been updated to note that the VDH reported 45 new cases in the health district but indicated 46 new cases in the breakdown of new cases by age group. The discrepancy was not explained in the state report.

Friday, Oct. 16: Manassas loses man in his 50s to COVID-19, health district adds 64 new cases

Manassas reported the death of a man in his 50s to COVID-19 on Friday. There were seven more local hospitalizations, including two among kids and teens ages 10 to 19, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The total number of local cases reported Friday — 64 — ticked down from Thursday’s 85 but remains higher than in recent weeks as cases continue to trend upward across the region and the state.

Virginia reported 1,183 new cases as well as 76 new hospitalizations and 20 new deaths on Friday. It’s the fifth time daily case numbers have exceeded 1,000 in the past week.

The local health district’s seven-day average percent-positivity rate ticked down, however, from 5.9% to 5.6%. Prince William continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia.

Local deaths: The loss of the Manassas man reported Friday marks the fifth local fatality reported since Tuesday and brings the Prince William Health District’s death toll due to the pandemic to 250.

On Tuesday, Oct. 13, the health district reported four deaths, those of one woman and three men. One was in their 30s, one was in their 60s and two were in their 70s. Three were residents of Prince William County and one was a resident of Manassas.

The county has so far lost 216 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 26 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 144 men and 106 women; one was in their 20s, four were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 24 were in their 50s, 59 were in their 60s, 63 were in their 70s, and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There continue to be two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 64 cases reported Friday, 61 were in Prince William County, two were in Manassas and one was in Manassas Park.

Local residents in their 20s and 30s reported the most new cases with 12 in each group.

Residents under 30 reported 25 or 39% of the 64 new cases, with kids age 9 and under reporting four; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting nine; and residents in their 20s reporting 12.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 27 or 42% of the 64 new cases. Those in their 30s reported 12 new cases, while those in their 40s reported 10 and those in their 50s reported five.

Residents ages 60 and older reported 11 or 17% of the 64 new cases, with nine among those in their 60s and two among those in their 70s. There were no new cases reported among residents age 80 or older. (There was no age information reported for one of the new cases.)

Percent-positivity rate: Seven-day, average percent-positivity rates fluctuated across Virginia on Friday.

Prince William Health District’s rate ticked down from 5.9% to 5.6% and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.4%, up from 5.1% on Thursday, and then by Rappahannock Health District, which each reported a rate of 4.8%, up from 4.6% on Thursday. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 4.2% to 4.1%, while the statewide rate ticked up from 4.7% to 4.8%.

Community transmission rates: According to a newer metric on the VDH website measuring community transmission of the coronavirus, Northern Virginia remains at a “low burden” of disease with “low community transmission,” but the data behind that designation are “fluctuating,” according to the VDH.

Only the Central region of the state is at “high burden” of disease with “substantial community transmission.”

All other regions of the state — including the Eastern, Near Southwest, Far Southwest and Northwest — are at a “moderate burden” of disease with “moderate community transmission.”

Hospitalizations: There were seven new hospitalizations reported in the Prince William Health District on Friday, including those of two kids and teens ages 10 to 19; one resident in their 30s; one in their 40s; one in their 50s and two in their 60s.

There were 1,002 people hospitalized across the state on Friday, down seven, with 222 in intensive care units, up two, and 104 on ventilators, unchanged from Thursday.

About 23% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 posted the most new cases on Friday with 17. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Codes 22192 and 22193, each of which posted nine new cases.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Thursday, Oct. 15: Prince William adds 85 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The number of new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations reported in the Prince William Health District was on the rise again on Thursday, with 85 new cases and five additional hospitalizations. But for the second day in a row, there were no new local deaths, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

That’s more than double the 31 new COVID-19 cases reported Wednesday but still lower than Tuesday’s spike, when the Prince William Health District reported 121 new cases, nine new hospitalizations and four additional deaths.

The local health district’s seven-day average, percent positivity rate also ticked up on Thursday from 5.5% to 5.9%. Prince William continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia.

New COVID-19 cases were also on the rise statewide, with 1,331 new COVID-19 cases reported across Virginia on Thursday. That’s the fifth-highest daily total since the pandemic began and the highest one-day total since Oct. 8, when the state reported 1,844 new cases in a one-day period.

In the Washington, D.C. region, cases reached a two-month high on Wednesday, according to the Washington Post.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District reported its most recent deaths on Tuesday — those of one woman and three men. One was in their 30s, one was in their 60s and two were in their 70s. Three were residents of Prince William County, while one was a resident of Manassas. The fatalities brought the local death toll due to the pandemic to 249.

The local health district reported five deaths last week. They included those of three women and two men. One was in their 30s, one was in their 50s, one was in their 60s and two were 80 or older.

The county has so far lost 216 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 143 men and 106 women; one was in their 20s, four were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 59 were in their 60s, 63 were in their 70s, and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 85 cases reported Thursday, 79 were in Prince William County and six were in Manassas. There were no new cases in Manassas Park.

Local residents in their 20s reported the most new cases with 19.

Residents under 30 reported 30 of the 85 new cases, with kids age 9 and under reporting two new cases; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting nine new cases; and residents in their 20s reporting 19.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 33 of the 85 new cases. Those in their 30s reported eight new cases, while those in their 40s reported 12 and those in their 50s reported 13.

Residents ages 60 and older reported 19 of the 85 new cases, with 11 among those in their 60s, seven among those in their 70s and one among residents age 80 or older. (There was no age information reported for three of the new cases.)

Percent-positivity rate: Seven-day, average percent-positivity rates were on the rise across Northern Virginia on Thursday.

Prince William Health District’s rate ticked up from 5.5% to 5.9% and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.1%, up from 4.6% on Wednesday, and then by Rappahannock Health District, which each reported a rate of 4.6%, unchanged from Wednesday. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked up from 3.9% to 4.2%, while the statewide rate ticked up from 4.6% to 4.7%.

Community transmission rates: According to a newer metric on the VDH website measuring community transmission of the coronavirus, Northern Virginia remains at a “low burden” of disease with “low community transmission,” but the data behind that designation are “fluctuating,” according to the VDH.

Only the Central region of the state is at “high burden” of disease with “substantial community transmission.”

All other regions of the state — including the Eastern, Near Southwest, Far Southwest and Northwest — are at a “moderate burden” of disease with “moderate community transmission.”

Hospitalizations: There were five new hospitalizations reported in the Prince William Health District on Thursday, including those of one resident in their 30s, two in their 40s, one in their 50s and one in their 70s.

There were 1,009 people hospitalized across the state on Thursday, up two, with 220 in intensive care units, down 10, and 104 on ventilators, up two.

About 22% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Thursday with 22. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191, which posted 18 new cases.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Wednesday, Oct. 14: Prince William adds 31 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

After an unusually high number of new COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths reported Tuesday, the numbers in the Prince William Health District were markedly lower on Wednesday, with only 31 new cases, one new hospitalization and no new deaths, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

That’s down from Tuesday’s 121 new cases, nine new hospitalizations and four additional deaths.

The local health district’s seven-day average, percent positivity rate also dropped on Wednesday, falling from 5.8% to 5.5%. That’s a new low, but Prince William continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia.

Statewide, 805 new COVID-19 cases were reported Wednesday, which is down from the more than 1,200 reported on Tuesday but still high compared to recent weeks. In the Washington, D.C. region, cases reached a two-month high on Wednesday, according to the Washington Post.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District reported its most recent deaths on Tuesday, those of one woman and three men. One was in their 30s, one was in their 60s and two were in their 70s. Three were residents of Prince William County, while one was a resident of Manassas. The fatalities brought the local death toll due to the pandemic to 249.

The local health district reported five deaths last week. They included those of three women and two men, one of whom was in their 30s, one in their 50s, one in their 60s and two age 80 or older.

The county has so far lost 216 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 143 men and 106 women; one was in their 20s, four were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 59 were in their 60s, 63 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 31 cases reported Wednesday, 30 were in Prince William County and one was in Manassas Park. There were no new cases reported in Manassas.

Local residents in their 60s reported the most new cases with eight.

Residents under 30 reported nine of the 31 new cases, with kids age 9 and under reporting five new cases; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting one new case; and residents in their 20s reporting three.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 10 of the 31 new cases. Those in their 30s reported three new cases, while those in their 40s reported seven. The number of cases among residents in their 50s was adjusted down one Wednesday.

Residents ages 60 and older reported 13 of the 31 new cases, with eight among those in their 60s, three among those in their 70s and two among residents age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate fell from 5.8% to 5.5% but continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County and Rappahannock health district, which each reported rates of 4.6%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 4.1% to 3.9%, while the statewide rate ticked up from 4.5% to 4.6%.

Community transmission rates: According to a newer metric on the VDH website measuring community transmission of the coronavirus, Northern Virginia remains at a “low burden” of disease with “low community transmission,” but the data behind that designation are “fluctuating,” according to the VDH.

Only the Central region of the state is at “high burden” of disease with “substantial community transmission.”

All other regions of the state — including the Eastern, Near Southwest, Far Southwest and Northwest — are at a “moderate burden” of disease with “moderate community transmission.”

Hospitalizations: There was one new hospitalizations reported in the Prince William Health District on Wednesday, that of a resident in their 30s.

There were 1,007 people hospitalized across the state on Wednesday, up eight, with 230 in intensive care units, up 30, and 102 on ventilators, up four.

About 23% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Gainesville ZIP Code 20155 posted the most new cases on Wednesday with seven. It was followed by several other Manassas an western Prince William ZIP Codes, which posted four new cases.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Tuesday, Oct. 13: Prince William loses 4 more to COVID-19, adds 121 cases

The Prince William Health District reported four new COVID-19 deaths on Tuesday, including the loss of a resident in their 30s, as well as nine hospitalizations and 121 new cases. It was only the third time the local health district reported more than 100 daily cases since August.

The most recent fatalities involve one woman and three men. One was in their 30s, one was in their 60s and two were in their 70s. Three were residents of Prince William County, while one was a resident of Manassas. The fatalities bring the local death toll due to the pandemic to 249.

Virginia as a whole, meanwhile, reported 1,235 new cases, up from the 854 reported Monday, as well as 45 additional hospitalizations and 11 more deaths.

The one bright spot in the report was that Prince William Health District’s seven-day average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked down from 6.3% to 5.8%, according to VDH Data.

Local deaths: Prior to the four deaths reported on Tuesday, Oct. 13, the Prince William Health District reported five deaths last week. They included those of three women and two men, one of whom was in their 30s, one in their 50s, one in their 60s and two age 80 or older.

The county has so far lost 216 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 143 men and 106 women; one was in their 20s, four were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 59 were in their 60s, 63 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 121 cases reported Tuesday, 115 were in Prince William County, while five were in Manassas and one was in Manassas Park.

Local residents in their 30s and 40s reported the most new cases with 29 in each age group.

Residents under 30 reported 42 of the 121 new cases, with kids age 9 and under reporting four new cases; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting 14 new cases; and residents in their 20s reporting 24.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 66 of the 121 new cases. Those in their 30s and 40s reported 29 new cases; while those in their 50s reported eight.

Residents ages 60 and older reported 13 of the 121 new cases, with eight among those in their 60s, four among those in their 70s and one among residents age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate fell from 6.3% to 5.8%, but continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.8%, down from 4.9% on Monday. Loudoun was followed by Rappahannock, which reported a rate of 4.6%, up from 4.5%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 4.2% to 4.1%, while the statewide rate held steady at 4.5%.

Community transmission rates: According to a newer metric on the VDH website measuring community transmission of the coronavirus, Northern Virginia remains at a “low burden” of disease with “low community transmission,” but the data behind that designation are “fluctuating,” according to the VDH.

Only the Central region of the state is at “high burden” of disease with “substantial community transmission.”

All other regions of the state — including the Eastern, Near Southwest, Far Southwest and Northwest — are at a “moderate burden” of disease with “moderate community transmission.”

Hospitalizations: There were nine new hospitalizations reported in the Prince William Health District on Tuesday, including those of one resident in their 20s, one in their 40s, two in their 50s, one in their 60s, three in their 70s and one age 80 or older.

There were 999 people hospitalized across the state on Tuesday, with 200 in intensive care units, down five, and 98 on ventilators, up six.

About 22% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Tuesday with 19. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191, which reported 17 new cases.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Monday, Oct. 12: Prince William reports 68 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 68 new COVID-19 cases on Monday, double the 34 reported Sunday, but no new hospitalizations nor deaths, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Virginia as a whole, meanwhile, reported 854 new cases, up from the 811 reported Sunday, as well as 34 additional hospitalizations and three more deaths.

The Prince William Health District’s seven-day average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked down from 6.7% to 6.3%, according to VDH Data.

Local deaths: Prince William County has reported five new COVID-19 deaths since Thursday, Oct. 8. They included those of three women and two men, one in their 30s, one in their 50s, one in their 60s and two age 80 or older.

The latest fatalities brought the local death toll due to the pandemic to 245.

The county has so far lost 213 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 139 men and 105 women; one was in their 20s, three were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 58 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: The VDH data did not include information Monday on the breakdown of the local health district’s 68 new COVID-19 cases. In other words, the number of cases reported in Prince William County, Manassas and Manassas Park were not separately reported.

Local residents in their 40s reported the most new cases with 16.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 41 of the 68 new cases. Those in their 30s reported 10 new cases; while those in their 40s reported 16; and those in their 50s reported 15.

Residents under 30 reported 18 of the 68 new cases, with kids age 9 and under reporting five new cases; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting five new cases; and residents in their 20s reporting eight.

Residents ages 60 and older reported eight new cases, with four among those in their 60s and four among those in their 70s. There were no new cases reported among residents age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate fell from 6.7% to 6.3% and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.9%, up from 4.8% on Sunday. Loudoun was followed by Rappahannock, which reported a rate of 4.6%, up from 4.1%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 4.4% to 4.2%, while the statewide rate also declined slightly from 4.6% to 4.5%.

Community transmission rates:  According to a newer metric on the VDH website measuring community transmission of the coronavirus, Northern Virginia remains at a “low burden” of disease with “low community transmission,” but the data behind that designation are “fluctuating,” according to the VDH.

Only the Central region of the state is at “high burden” of disease with “substantial community transmission.”

All other regions of the state — including the Eastern, Near Southwest, Far Southwest and Northwest — are at a “moderate burden” of disease with “moderate community transmission.”

Hospitalizations: There were 205 patients in intensive care units, up four, as well as 92 on ventilators, down six. About 22% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Monday with 13. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Codes 20109 and 20110, which reported 10 each.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Sunday, Oct. 11: Prince William reports 34 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 34 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday, a drop from recent days, as well as one hospitalization, that of a person in their 50s. For the second day in a row, the local health department reported no additional deaths.

Virginia as a whole, meanwhile, reported 811 new cases, down from the more than 1,000 cases reported in each of the last four days, as well as 18 additional hospitalizations and four deaths.

The local health department’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked up from 6.6% to 6.7%, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Local deaths: Prince William County has reported five new COVID-19 deaths since Thursday, Oct. 8. They included those of three women and two men, one in their 30s, one in their 50s, one in their 60s and two age 80 or older.

The latest fatalities brought the local death toll due to the pandemic to 245.

The county has so far lost 213 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 140 men and 105 women; one was in their 20s, three were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 58 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 34 new cases reported in the health district on Sunday, 31 were in Prince William County, two were in Manassas and one was in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s and 50s reported the most new cases with eight in each age group.

Residents under 30 reported 15 of the 34 new cases, with kids age 9 and under reporting one new case; those between the ages of 10 and 19 reporting six new cases and residents in their 20s reporting eight.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 16 new cases. Those in their 30s reported five new cases, while those in their 40s reported three and those in their 50s reported eight.

Residents ages 60 and older reported three new cases, with one among those in their 60s and two among those in their 70s. There were no new cases reported among residents age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate ticked up again on Sunday from 6.6% to 6.7% and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.8%, unchanged from Saturday. Loudoun was followed by Rappahannock, which reported a rate of 4.1%, down from 4.3%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked up from 4.3% to 4.4%, while the statewide rate also declined slightly from 4.7% to 4.6%.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Sunday fell from 943 to 924, down 19.

There were 201 patients in intensive care units, down seven, as well as 98 on ventilators, down one. About 22% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Sunday with six. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Codes 20109 and 20110, which reported five each.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Saturday, Oct. 10: COVID-19 cases on the rise statewide, in most local ZIP Codes

For the fourth day in a row, Virginia reported more than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday with 1,256, pushing the seven-day average of new cases to 1,015 — the highest since early September.

The Prince William Health District reported 56 new COVID-19 cases and two new hospitalizations, including that of a resident between the ages of 10 and 19.

Meanwhile, there were no new COVID-19 deaths reported locally on Saturday, but cases were on the rise in most local ZIP Codes since last week. The average number of new COVID-19 cases reported daily since Oct. 3 was higher in 12 of 20 local ZIP Codes, while remaining steady in eight.

Four smaller, mostly rural local ZIP Codes continued to see virtually no new cases added over the past week, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Across the state, Virginia also added 54 hospitalizations and 10 more deaths.

Local deaths: Prince William County reported five new COVID-19 deaths since Thursday, Oct. 8. They included those of three women and two men, one in their 30s, one in their 50s, one in their 60s and two age 80 or older.

The latest fatalities brought the local death toll due to the pandemic to 245.

The county has so far lost 213 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 140 men and 105 women; one was in their 20s, three were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 58 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 56 new cases reported in the health district on Saturday, 55 were in Prince William County and one was in Manassas. There were no new cases reported in Manassas Park.

Residents under the age of 30 reported most of the new cases with 26. Kids age 9 and under reported three new cases, while those between the ages of 10 and 19 reported 11. Residents in their 20s reported the most of any age group with 12.

Residents between the ages of 30 and 59 reported 25 new cases. Those in their 30s reported 10 new cases, while those in their 40s reported nine and those in their 50s reported 6.

Residents ages 60 and older reported five new cases, with two among those in their 60s, one among those in their 70s and two in residents ages 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate ticked up from 6.5% to 6.6% on Saturday and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia.

Prince William was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.8%, down from 5.1% on Friday, and then by Rappahannock, which reported a rate of 4.3%, down from 4.5%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 4.4% to 4.3%, while the statewide rate also declined slightly from 4.8% to 4.7%.

Hospitalizations: There were two more hospitalizations reported locally on Saturday, that of a resident between the ages of 10 and 19 and one in their 50s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Saturday fell from 963 to 943, down 20.

There were 208 patients in intensive care units, up three, as well as 97 on ventilators, up 10. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 posted the most new cases on Saturday with nine. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 and Manassas ZIP Code 2011 with seven in each.

As of Saturday, Oct. 10, the seven-day average number of new cases reported daily rose in 12 of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

Four local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last four weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Friday, Oct. 9: Prince William reports 1 new COVID-19 death, adds 57 new cases

The Prince William Health District reported the loss of a man in his 60s due to COVID-19 on Friday. It was the fifth local death reported in the past two days, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The deaths of four Prince William residents were reported on Thursday: those of three women and one man, one of whom was in their 30s, one in their 50s and two age 80 or older.

The health district also reported 57 new cases of the virus on Friday as well as six additional hospitalizations.

Virginia as a whole again reported more than 1,000 new cases on Friday. There were 1,114 new cases reported statewide as well as 54 new hospitalizations and 16 more deaths.

Local deaths: The latest fatality brings the local death toll due to the pandemic to 245.

The county has so far lost 213 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 140 men and 105 women; one was in their 20s, three were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 58 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 57 new cases reported in the health district on Friday, 45 were in Prince William County, while nine were in Manassas and three were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s reported the most new cases with 17, followed by residents in their 30s, who reported nine.

Kids and teens age 10 to 19 reported two new cases, while those age 9 and under reported five.

Residents in their 50s reported seven new cases, while those in their 60s, 70s and age 80 and older reported three new cases in each age group.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate held steady at 6.5% on Friday and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.1%, and then by Rappahannock, which reported a rate of 4.5%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole remained steady at 4.4%, while the statewide rate remained 4.8%.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, continues to have “low community transmission,” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: There were six more local hospitalizations due to COVID-19 reported Friday, including that of a resident in their 30s, two in their 40s, one in their 50s, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older. Since the start of the pandemic, 1,127 local residents have been hospitalized for COVID-19.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Friday rose from 933 to 963, up 30.

There were 205 patients in intensive care units, up nine, as well as 87 on ventilators, down two. About 22% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and 22192 posted the most new cases on Friday with 10 in each area.

As of Sunday, Oct. 4, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases rose in three local ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109, Warrenton-area ZIP Code 20187 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Five local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last three weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20137 (Broad Run), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Thursday, Oct. 8: Prince William reports 4 more COVID-19 deaths, 190 cases since Tuesday

The Prince William Health District reported four additional deaths due to COVID-19 on Thursday, those of three women and one man, one in their 30s, one in their 50s and two age 80 or older.

The health district also reported 190 new cases over the past two days as well as five new hospitalizations, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The local health district reported 54 new cases on Wednesday, Oct. 7, and 136 new cases on Thursday, Oct. 8. The VDH said some of the new cases reported Thursday should have been reported Wednesday but were not because of a reporting error.

Virginia as a whole reported 1,844 new cases on Thursday and 509 on Wednesday, for a two-day total of 2,353 — higher than in recent days. There were 29 additional hospitalizations reported across the state on Wednesday and 48 on Thursday for a total of 77.

Total deaths over the last two days were 37, including 12 on Wednesday and 25 on Thursday. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,328.

Local deaths: The latest fatalities bring the local death toll due to the pandemic to 244. Prior to Thursday, the last local death, that of a man in his 60s, was reported Friday, Oct. 2.

The county has so far lost 212 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 139 men and 105 women; one was in their 20s, three were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 23 were in their 50s, 57 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 91 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 190 new cases reported in the health district on Wednesday and Thursday, 172 were in Prince William County while 13 were in Manassas and five were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s reported the most new cases over the past two days with 45, followed by residents in their 40s and kids and teens age 10 to 19 which reported 27 among each group.

Kids age 9 and under reported 21 new cases over the past two days.

Residents in their 30s reported 25 new cases, while those in their 50s reported 20. Residents in their 60s reported 12 new cases, those in their 70s reported five and those age 80 and older reported one.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate was 6.5% on Thursday and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.9%, and then by Rappahannock, which reported a rate of 4.7%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole remained steady at 4.4%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.” Data behind that determination are “fluctuating” according to the latest report.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, continues to have “low community transmission,” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: There were five more local hospitalizations due to COVID-19 reported over the last two days, including a resident in their 30s, two on their 60s, one in their 70s and one for which an age was not reported. Since the start of the pandemic, 1,121 local residents have been hospitalized for COVID-19.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Thursday rose from 926 to 933, up seven.

There were 196 patients in intensive care units, down 23, as well as 89 on ventilators, down 15. About 23% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Thursday with 27, followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22192 with 22. Manassas area ZIP Codes 20109 and 20111 and Gainesville Zip Code 20155 each reported 10 new cases.

As of Sunday, Oct. 4, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases rose in only three local ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109, Warrenton-area ZIP Code 20187 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Five local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last three weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20137 (Broad Run), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Tuesday, Oct. 6: Prince William reports 32 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 32 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday — 10 fewer than were reported on Monday and about one-third the 91 new cases reported Sunday. Also, for the fourth day in a row, no new local deaths were reported.

In Virginia as a whole, new cases were again below 1,000 on Tuesday, with 625, down from 687 the day before. There were 57 additional hospitalizations reported across the state on Tuesday as well as 15 more deaths.

Meanwhile, the state’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked up from 4.8% to 4.9%, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,291.

Local deaths: The latest local death, that of a man in his 60s, was reported Friday, Oct. 2. The local death toll now stands at 240 — one less than Sunday — because the total number of deaths was adjusted down one on Monday, Oct. 5. The the death of a woman in her 70s was reclassified, according to VDH data.

The county has so far lost 208 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 138 men and 102 women; one was in their 20s, two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 57 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 89 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 32 new cases reported in the health district on Tuesday, 28 were in Prince William County while four were in Manassas. There were no new cases reported in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Tuesday with 19, followed by residents in their 40s, who reported 10.

The total number of cases among kids and teens ages 10 to 19 was adjusted down 10 on Tuesday to 1,452. The adjustment was made on the VDH website without explanation.

Kids age 9 and under reported two new cases.

Residents in their 20s reported one new case, while those in their 50s reported two new cases, those in their 60s reported four and those in their 70s reported two.

There were no new cases reported among residents age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate ticked up again on Tuesday from 6% to 6.6% and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed by the Rappahannock Health District, which reported a rate of 4.9%, down from 5% on Monday. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked up from 4.2% to 4.4%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.” Data behind that determination are “fluctuating” according to the latest report.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, continues to have “low community transmission,” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: There were three more local hospitalizations due to COVID-19 reported on Tuesday, those of a resident in their 30s, a resident in their 50s and one in their 60s. Since the start of the pandemic, 1,116 local residents have been hospitalized for COVID-19.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Tuesday rose from 925 to 926, up one.

There were 219 patients in intensive care units, up six, as well as 104 on ventilators, up three. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109 posted the most new cases on Tuesday with 10, followed by Manassas area ZIP Codes 20110 and 20111, which reported seven new cases each.

As of Sunday, Oct. 4, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases rose in only three local ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109, Warrenton-area ZIP Code 20187 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Five local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last three weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20137 (Broad Run), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Monday, Oct. 5: Prince William reports 42 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 42 new COVID-19 cases on Monday — about half the 91 reported Sunday — but no new deaths.

In Virginia as a whole, new cases fell below 1,000 for the first time since Friday with 687 new cases reported Monday along with 38 additional hospitalizations and three more deaths.

Meanwhile, the state’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked up from 4.7% to 4.8%, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,276.

Local deaths: The latest local death, that of a man in his 60s, was reported Friday, Oct. 2. The local death toll now stands at 240 — one less than Sunday — because the total number of deaths was adjusted down one on Monday, Oct. 5. The the death of a woman in her 70s was reclassified, according to VDH data.

The county has so far lost 208 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 138 men and 102 women; one was in their 20s, two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 57 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 89 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 42 new cases reported in the health district on Monday, 39 were in Prince William County while three were in Manassas. There were no new cases reported in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s reported the most new cases on Monday with 10, followed by residents in their 50s, who reported eight.

They were followed by kids and teens ages 10 to 19, who reported seven new cases, as did residents in their 30s.

Kids age 9 and under reported three new cases, while those age 80 and older reported one. There were no new cases reported residents in their 60s and 70s.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate ticked up from 5.8% to 6% on Monday and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed by the Rappahannock Health District, which reported a rate of 5%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole held steady at 4.2%.

Regarding regions of the state, the Southwest region again led the state in percent-positivity rate with 6.2%. It was followed by Northwest Virginia, which posted a rate of 5%, also unchanged from Sunday.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.” Data behind that determination are “fluctuating” according to the latest report.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, continues to have “low community transmission,” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: There were four local hospitalizations due to COVID-19 reported on Monday, those of two residents in their 20s, one resident in their 30s and one in their 40s. Since the start of the pandemic, 1,113 local residents have been hospitalized for COVID-19.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Monday rose from 877 to 925, up 48.

There were 213 patients in intensive care units, up 16, as well as 101 on ventilators, up three. About 19% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 and Manassas ZIP Code 20109 posted the most new cases on Monday with seven.

As of Sunday, Oct. 4, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases rose in only three local ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109, Warrenton-area ZIP Code 20187 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Five local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last three weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20137 (Broad Run), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Sunday, Oct. 4: Prince William reports 91 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 91 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday — nearly triple the 33 reported on Saturday — but no new deaths.

In Virginia as a whole, however, new cases surpassed 1,000 for the second consecutive day with 1,067 new cases reported Sunday along with 30 additional hospitalizations and three more deaths.

The state’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests held steady at 4.7%, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,273.

Local deaths: The latest local death, that of a man in his 60s, was reported Friday, Oct. 2. The local death toll now stands at 241.

The county has so far lost 209 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 139 men and 102 women; one was in their 20s, two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 57 were in their 60s, 62 were in their 70s and 89 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 91 new cases reported in the health district on Sunday, 77 were in Prince William County while 11 were in Manassas and three were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 40s reported the most new cases on Sunday with 24. They were followed by residents in their 20s, who reported 22 new cases, and then by residents in their 30s, who reported 15.

Kids and teens ages 10 through 19 reported nine new cases, while children age 9 and under reported four.

Residents in their 50s reported eight new cases, while those in their 60s reported four and those in their 70s reported five. There were no new cases reported among residents age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate held steady at 5.8% on Sunday and continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed Sunday by the Rappahannock Health District, which reported a rate of 5.2%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg as well as Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole held steady at 4.2%.

Regarding regions of the state, the Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 6.2%, up from 6% on Saturday. It was followed by Northwest Virginia, which posted a rate of 5%, up from 4.8% the day before.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.” The data behind that determination are decreasing, however, the VDH says.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, has “low community transmission” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: There was one local hospitalization due to COVID-19 reported on Sunday, that of a resident in their 30s. Since the start of the pandemic, 1,109 local residents have been hospitalized for COVID-19.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Sunday fell from 906 to 877, down 29.

There were 197 patients in intensive care units, up six, as well as 98 on ventilators, down five. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Sunday with 18. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Codes 20109 and 20111, which reported 15 new cases each.

As of Sunday, Oct. 4, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases rose in only three local ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109, Warrenton-area ZIP Code 20187 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Five local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last three weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20137 (Broad Run), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Saturday, Oct. 3: Prince William reports 33 new cases of COVID-19, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 33 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday, but no new deaths. Virginia as a whole, however, reported more than 1,000 new cases for the first time in two weeks as well as 51 additional hospitalizations and 20 more deaths.

Virginia added 1,116 new cases on Saturday, Oct. 3, and the statewide percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests rose from 4.5% to 4.7%, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,270.

Local deaths: The latest local death, that of a man in his 60s, was reported Friday, Oct. 2. The VDH adjusted the number of deaths in Prince William County down one without explanation. The local death toll now stands at 241.

The county has so far lost 209 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

Victims include 139 men and 102 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 57 were in their 60s, 62 were in their 70s and 89 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 33 new cases reported in the health district on Saturday, 27 were in Prince William County while six were in Manassas. There were no new cases in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s reported the most new cases on Saturday with eight. They were followed by residents in their 30s and 40s, who reported seven in each age group.

Residents in their 50s reported six new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 through 19 reported two new cases, while those in their 70s reported two.

There were no new cases reported among kids age 9 and under as well as none reported by residents in their 60s or age 80 or older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate, while ticking down from 5.9% to 5.8%, continues to be the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed Saturday by the Rappahannock Health District, which reported a rate of 5.2%. Rappahannock includes Fredericksburg, Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole held steady at 4.2%.

Regarding regions of the state, the Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 6%, up from 5.8% on Friday. It was followed by Northwest Virginia, which posted a rate of 4.8%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.”

The data behind that determination are decreasing, however, the VDH says.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, has “low community transmission” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: There was one local hospitalization due to COVID-19 reported on Saturday, that of a resident in their 20s. Since the start of the pandemic, 1,108 local residents have been hospitalized for COVID-19.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Saturday rose from 890 to 906, up 16.

There were 191 patients in intensive care units, down 12, as well as 103 on ventilators, down five. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Manassas ZIP Code 20110 posted the most new cases on Saturday with eight. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191, which reported seven new cases.

As of Saturday, Oct. 3, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases rose in only three local ZIP Codes: Manassas ZIP Code 20109, Warrenton-area ZIP Code 20187 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Five local ZIP Codes have had a daily average of zero new cases for the last three weeks: ZIP Codes: 20119 (Catlett), 20137 (Broad Run), 20143 (Catharpin), 22125 (Occoquan) and 22134 (Quantico).

Friday, Oct. 2: Prince William loses another resident to COVID-19, adds 46 cases

Prince William County has lost another resident to COVID-19, a man in his 60s, bringing the number of local deaths reported this week to six, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The health district also reported 46 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday and three more hospitalizations, including those of residents in their 60s and 70s as well as one resident age 80s or older.

Also, the Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked below 6% on Friday — returning to 5.9%. The Prince William Health District, however, continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 966 new COVID-19 cases on Friday — more than twice the number reported the day before — as well as 48 new hospitalizations and 22 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,250.

Local deaths: Prince William County has so far lost 210 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 24 and Manassas Park, eight.

The number of fatalities in Prince William County were adjusted up by two in addition to the new fatality reported Friday, while deaths in the City of Manassas were reduced by two to 24, the VDH report said.

The local death toll now stands at 242. Victims include 139 men and 103 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 57 were in their 60s, 62 were in their 70s and 90 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center.

There are two “outbreaks in progress” at long-term care centers in the county. They are located at Potomac Place and a Manassas Rehabilitation and Health. There have been six cases at Potomac Place and five or fewer at Manassas Rehabilitation and Health, according to VDH data.

The total number of outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 46 new cases reported in the health district on Friday, all were in Prince William County. No new cases were reported in Manassas or Manassas Park. The total number of cases in Manassas was adjusted down by one in the VDH report.

Residents in their 50s reported the most new cases on Friday with 10. They were followed by kids and teens ages 10 through 19 with nine new cases.

Residents in their 30s reported eight new cases, while those in their 40s reported six. Residents in their 60s reported five new cases, while those in their 70s reported three new cases and those in their 20s reported two.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District continued to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia with 5.9%. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.2%. Both saw slight decreases from Thursday.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole dipped from 4.3% to 4.2% on Friday.

Regarding regions of the state, the Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 5.8%, up from 5.7% on Thursday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 4.6%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.”

The data behind that determination are decreasing, however, the VDH says.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, has “low community transmission” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Friday fell from 913 to 890, down 23.

There were 201 patients in intensive care units, down nine, as well as 108 on ventilators, up one. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Friday with 16. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Code 20109 and Dumfries ZIP Code 22026, which each reported six new cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes over the past week while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Thursday, Oct. 1: Prince William loses 2 more residents to COVID-19, adds 27 new cases

Prince William County has lost two more residents to COVID-19, a man and a woman, one in their 60s and one age 80 or older, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

The latest two fatalities, both reported on Thursday, bring the local death toll due to the pandemic to 241. Five local deaths were reported in just the last two days.

The health district also reported 27 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday and four more hospitalizations, including those of residents in their 40s, 50s and 60s as well as one resident age 80 or older.

Also, the Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked up for the first time in recent days, rising from 5.9%, an all-time low, to 6%. The Prince William Health District continues to have the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia.

Virginia’s statewide percent-positivity rate remains below the key measure of 5%, holding steady at 4.5% on Thursday.

Virginia added 450 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday as well as 51 new hospitalizations and 20 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,228.

Prince William County has so far lost 207 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 26 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 138 men and 103 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 56 were in their 60s, 62 were in their 70s and 90 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 27 new cases reported in the health district on Thursday, all were in Prince William County. No new cases were reported in Manassas or Manassas Park. The total number of cases in Manassas Park was adjusted down by one in the VDH report.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Thursday with seven. They were followed by residents in their 60s with six new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported two new cases on Thursday, while those ages 9 and under reported three new cases.

Residents in their 70s reported one new case, while those in their 50s and those age 80 and older reported no new cases.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District continued to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia with 5.9%. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4.3%, also a slight rise from Wednesday’s 4%.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole dipped from 4.5% to 4.3% on Thursday.

The Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 5.7%, up from 5.6% on Wednesday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 4.4%, and then by NOVA, with 4.3%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.”

The data behind that determination are decreasing, however, the VDH says.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, has “low community transmission” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Thursday rose from 908 to 913, up five.

There were 210 patients in intensive care units, up 20, as well as 107 on ventilators, up three. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Thursday with seven. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Code 20109, which reported five new cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Wednesday, Sept. 30: Prince William loses 3 more residents to COVID-19, adds 31 new cases

The deaths of three more local residents due to COVID-19 were reported on Wednesday, those of two women and one man, one of whom was in their 70s and two age 80 or older.

The latest fatalities included two Prince William County residents and one resident of the City of Manassas. They bring the local death toll due to the pandemic to 239, according to the Prince William Health District.

The health district also reported 31 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday and three more hospitalizations, including those of residents in their 50s, 60s and 70s.

The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests continued to tick down on Wednesday, however, dropping from 6% to 5.9%, the lowest level since the VDH began posting local percent-positivity rates in March.

Virginia’s statewide percent-positivity rate remains below the key measure of 5%, dropping from 4.6% to 4.5% on Wednesday.

Virginia added 755 new COVID-19 cases on Wednesday as well as 63 new hospitalizations and 21 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,208.

Local deaths: Prior to Wednesday’s report, the most recent local death, that of a Prince William County man in his 50s, was reported on Saturday, Sept. 26.

Prince William County has so far lost 205 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 26 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 137 men and 102 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 62 were in their 70s and 89 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 31 new cases reported in the health district on Wednesday, 26 were in Prince William County and five were in Manassas. The total number of cases in Manassas Park was adjusted down by two in the VDH report.

Residents in their 20s reported the most new cases on Wednesday with 20. They were followed by residents in their 50s with five new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported no new cases on Wednesday, while those ages 9 and under reported four new cases.

Residents in their 60s reported one new case, while those in their 70s reported two. There was one new case reported in residents age 80 and older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District continued to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia with 5.9%. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 4%.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole dipped from 4.8% to 4.5% on Wednesday.

The Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 5.6%, up from 5.3% on Tuesday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 5%, and then by NOVA, with 4.5%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure on the VDH website that measures community transmission of the virus, only the “Near Southwest” region of Virginia has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.”

The data behind that determination are decreasing, however, the VDH says.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, has “low community transmission” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Wednesday fell from 958 to 908, down 50.

There were 190 patients in intensive care units, down 12, as well as 104 on ventilators, down nine. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Wednesday with 11. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Codes 20109 and 20110, which reported three cases each.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Tuesday, Sept. 29: Prince William reports 67 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 67 new COVID-19 cases on Tuesday — almost twice the 36 reported Monday — as well as the hospitalization of a child age 9 or under due to COVID-19.

But for the third day in a row, the local health district reported no new deaths, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Also, the Prince William Health District percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests continued to tick down on Tuesday, dropping from 6.3% to 6%. Virginia’s statewide rate remains below the key measure of 5%, dipping again on Tuesday from 4.7% to 4.6%.

Virginia added 923 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Tuesday — a large jump from the 449 reported on Monday — as well as 62 new hospitalizations and 15 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,187.

Local deaths: The most recent local death, that of a Prince William County man in his 50s, was reported on Saturday, Sept. 26. The fatality marked the 13th local death reported since Saturday, Sept. 12, and brought the local death toll to 236.

Prince William County has so far lost 203 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 136 men and 100 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 67 new cases reported in the health district on Tuesday, 57 were in Prince William County, seven were in Manassas and three were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Tuesday with 19. They were followed by residents in their 50s with 11 new cases and then by residents in their 40s with 10.

Residents in their 20s reported three new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported three new cases while those ages 9 and under reported six new cases.

Residents in their 60s reported five new cases, while those in their 70s reported no new cases. There was one new case reported in residents age 80 and older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District continued to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia with 6%. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.2%. Both saw a slight decline from Monday.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole held steady at 4.8% on Tuesday.

The Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 5.3%, down from 5.5% on Monday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 5.1%, and then by NOVA, with 4.8%.

Transmission extent by region: According to a new measure included on the VDH website that measures the extent of community transmission of the virus, only the Southwest region of Virginia currently has a “high transmission extent” with “substantial community transmission.” The data behind that determination are decreasing, however, the VDH says.

Northern Virginia, which includes Prince William County, has “low community transmission” the rating says.

All other regions of Virginia — Central, Eastern, Far Southwest and Northwest — show “moderate community spread,” the VDH website says.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported four new hospitalizations on Tuesday. One involved a child age 9 or under, two were residents in their 50s and one was a resident in their 60s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Tuesday rose from 890 to 958, up 68.

There were 202 patients in intensive care units, up nine, as well as 113 on ventilators, up 10. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Tuesday with 17. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Code 22191, which reported 15 cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily fell over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Monday, Sept. 28: Prince William tops 15,000 total COVID-19 cases, no new local deaths reported

The Prince William Health District reported 36 new COVID-19 cases on Monday, bringing the total number of cases reported locally since the pandemic began to 15,016.

There were also two hospitalizations reported on Monday. But for the second day in a row, the local health district reported no additional deaths, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Also, the Prince William Health District percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests continued to tick down on Monday, dropping from 6.5% to 6.3%. Virginia’s statewide rate remains below the key measure of 5%, dipping again on Monday from 4.8% to 4.7%.

Virginia added 449 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Monday — about 300 fewer than were reported Sunday — as well as 27 new hospitalizations and 13 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday, Sept. 20, and now stands at 3,172.

Local deaths: The most recent local death, that of a Prince William County man in his 50s, was reported on Saturday, Sept. 26. The fatality marked the 13th local death reported since Saturday, Sept. 12, bringing the local death toll to 236.

The VDH has been working through a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the past three to four weeks, the agency’s website says.

Prince William County has so far lost 203 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 136 men and 100 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 36 new cases reported in the health district on Monday, 35 were in Prince William County and one was in Manassas Park. The VDH reduced the total number of cases in the City of Manassas by one.

Residents in their 40s reported the most new cases on Monday with nine. They were followed by residents in their 20s and 50s with six new cases in each age group.

Residents in their 20s reported six new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported five new cases while those ages 9 and under reported two new cases.

Residents in their 60s reported no new cases, while those in their 70s reported one new case. There were no new cases reported by residents age 80 and older.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District continued to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia with 6.3%. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.3% on Monday, a slight increase from Sunday.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 4.9% to 4.8% on Monday.

The Southwest region again led the state with a rate of 5.5%, down from 5.6% on Sunday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 5.2%, and then by NOVA, with 4.8%.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported two new hospitalizations on Monday, involving one resident in their 30s and one in their 40s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Monday rose from 868 to 890, up 22.

There were 193 patients in intensive care units, down five, as well as 103 on ventilators, unchanged from Sunday. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 posted the most new cases on Monday with 10. It was followed by Manassas ZIP Code 20109, which reported five new cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new cases reported daily had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Sunday, Sept. 27: Prince William reports 59 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 59 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday as well as the hospitalization of a patient in their 50s. But for the first time since Wednesday, no additional local deaths were reported, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Also, the Prince William Health District percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests continued to tick down on Sunday, dropping from 6.8% to 6.5%. Virginia’s statewide rate remains below the key measure of 5%, holding steady at 4.8%.

Virginia added 736 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Sunday as well as 26 new hospitalizations and 15 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 last Sunday and now stands at 3,159.

Local deaths: The death of the Prince William County man in his 50s, reported on Saturday, Sept. 26, marked the 13th local death reported since Saturday, Sept. 12. The local death toll stands at 236.

The death of a Manassas Park man in his 70s was reported Friday, Sept. 25. The death of a Prince William County woman in her 70s was reported on Thursday, Sept. 24, while the deaths of a man and a woman, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older, were reported on Tuesday, Sept. 22.

The VDH has been working through a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the past three to four weeks, the agency’s website says.

Prince William County has so far lost 203 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 136 men and 100 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 59 new cases reported in the health district on Sunday, 55 were in Prince William County, while two were in Manassas and two were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Sunday with 13. They were followed by residents in their 40s with 10 new cases and then by residents in their 20s and 50s with nine in each age group.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported six new cases while those ages 9 and under reported three new cases.

Residents in their 60s reported four new cases, while those in their 70s reported one new case and those age 80 and older reported two.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District continued to report the highest percent-positivity rate in Northern Virginia with 6.5%, down from 6.8% on Saturday. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.2% on Sunday, down from 5.8% on Saturday.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 5.2% to 4.9%.

The Southwest region led the state with a rate of 5.6%, down from 5.7% on Saturday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 5.3%, and then by NOVA, with 4.9%.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported one new hospitalization on Sunday involving a resident in their 50s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Friday fell from 924 to 868, down 56.

There were 198 patients in intensive care units, down four, as well as 103 on ventilators, down eight. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 posted the most new cases on Sunday with 13. It was followed by 22193, also in Woodbridge, with 10 and then by Manassas ZIP Code 20109 with eight.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Sunday, Sept. 27: Prince William loses man in his 50s to COVID-19, adds 76 new cases

The Prince William Health District reported the loss of another resident to COVID-19 on Saturday, that of a county man in his 50s. The latest fatality brings the local death toll due to the pandemic to 236, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Meanwhile, 76 new local COVID-19 cases were reported on Saturday as well as two additional hospitalizations, those of one resident in their 30s and one in their 50s.

The bright spot in Saturday’s COVID-19 report was that both the state and local seven-day, average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests continued to fall. For the first time since the pandemic began, Virginia’s statewide rate is below the key measure of 5%, falling to 4.8%.

Prince William County’s rate also ticked down from 7.1% to 6.8%. Still, Prince William’s rate remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 975 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Saturday as well as 57 new hospitalizations and eight additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 last Sunday and now stands at 3,144.

Local deaths: The death of the Prince William County man in his 50s on Saturday marks the 13th local death reported in the last two weeks, since Saturday, Sept. 12.

The death of a Manassas Park man in his 70s was reported Friday, Sept. 25. The death of a Prince William County woman in her 70s was reported on Thursday, Sept. 24, while the deaths of a man and a woman, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older, were reported on Tuesday, Sept. 22.

The VDH has been working through a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the past three to four weeks, the agency’s website says.

Prince William County has so far lost 203 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 136 men and 100 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 22 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 76 new cases reported in the health district on Saturday, all were in Prince William County. Neither Manassas nor Manassas Park reported new cases, hospitalizations or deaths.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Saturday with 20. They were followed by residents in their 40s with 15 new cases, residents in their 20s with 13 and residents in their 50s with 12.

Residents in their 50s and 60s reported six new cases, while kids age 9 and under reported five.

Percent-positivity rate:  In Northern Virginia, Prince William Health District reported the highest percent-positivity rate on Saturday with 6.8%, down from 7.1% on Friday. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 5.9% on Saturday, down from 6% on Friday.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole also ticked down from 5.3% to 5.2%.

The Southwest region led the state with a rate of 5.7%, down from 6% on Friday. It was followed by Eastern Virginia, which posted a rate of 5.4%, and then by NOVA, with 5.2%.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported two new hospitalizations on Saturday involving one resident in their 30s and one in their 50s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Friday fell from 965 to 924, down 41.

There were 202 patients in intensive care units, down 19, as well as 111 on ventilators, down six. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 posted the most new cases on Saturday with 18. It was followed by 22193, also in Woodbridge, with 15 and then by Manassas ZIP Code 20109 with 10.

As of Saturday, Sept. 26, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in nine.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only two local ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Coded 20109, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Friday, Sept. 25: Manassas Park loses a resident in his 70s to COVID-19, county adds 79 cases

The Prince William Health District reported the loss of another resident to COVID-19 on Friday, that of a Manassas Park man in his 70s. The latest fatality brings the local death toll due to the pandemic to 235, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Meanwhile, 79 new local COVID-19 cases were reported on Friday as well as two additional hospitalizations, that of one resident in their 30s and one in their 50s.

The local health district’s seven-day, average percent-positivity rate on local tests ticked down again, however, on Friday from 7.2% to 7.1%. Still, Prince William’s rate remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 941 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Friday as well as 37 new hospitalizations and 23 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday and now stands at 3,136.

Local deaths: Prior to Friday’s report of a death of a Manassas Park man in his 70s, the health district reported the death of a Prince William County woman in her 70s on Thursday. The deaths of a man and a woman, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older, were reported on Tuesday, Sept. 22.

The Prince William Health District has reported 12 deaths since Saturday, Sept. 19. They included those of a resident in their 20s as well as those in their 60s, 70s and 80 or older, according to VDH data.

The VDH has been working through a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the past three to four weeks, the agency’s website says.

Prince William County has so far lost 202 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, eight.

Local victims include 135 men and 100 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 61 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 71 new cases reported in the health district on Friday, 68 were in Prince William County, eight were in Manassas and three were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Friday with 17. They were followed by residents in their 20s with 15 and then by residents in their 40s, with 14.

Residents in their 50s reported 10 new cases, while those in their 60s reported five. One case was reported among residents in their 70s.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported eight new cases, as did kids ages 9 and under.

Percent-positivity rate: The state’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked down from 5.3% to 5.1%.

In Northern Virginia, Prince William Health District reported the highest rate, with 7.1%, which was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 6%. Both were lower than the day before.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole also ticked down from 5.4% to 5.3%.

The Southwest region led the state with a rate of 6%. It was followed by Northern Virginia.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported two new hospitalizations on Thursday involving one resident in their 30s and one in their 50s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Friday fell from 982 to 965, down 17.

There were 221 patients in intensive care units, up two, as well as 117 on ventilators, up five. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: The Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 posted the most new cases on Friday with 22. It was followed by 22191, also in Woodbridge, with 12.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Thursday, Sept. 24: Prince William loses a resident in her 70s to COVID-19, adds 41 cases

The Prince William Health District lost another resident to COVID-19 on Thursday, a woman in her 70s. The latest fatality brings the local death toll due to the pandemic to 234, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Meanwhile, 41 new local COVID-19 cases were reported on Thursday as well as two additional hospitalizations, that of one resident in their 20s and one in their 30s.

The local health district’s seven-day, average percent-positivity rate on local tests ticked down again, however, on Thursday from 7.5% to 7.2%. Still, Prince William’s rate remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 902 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Thursday as well as 51 new hospitalizations and 24 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday and now stands at 3,113.

Local deaths: Prior to Thursday’s report of a death of a woman in her 70s, the most recent local deaths, those of a man and a woman, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older, were reported on Tuesday, Sept. 22.

The Prince William Health District has reported 11 deaths since Saturday, Sept. 19. They included those of a resident in their 20s as well as those in their 60s, 70s and 80 or older, according to VDH data.

The VDH has been working through a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the past three to four weeks, the agency’s website says.

Prince William County has so far lost 202 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, seven.

Local victims include 134 men and 100 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 60 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 41 new cases reported in the health district on Thursday, 35 were in Prince William County and six were in Manassas. There were no new cases in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s and 30s reported the most new cases on Thursday with nine in each age group. They were followed by residents in their 40s, who reported six new cases. Residents in their 50s reported five new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported three new cases as did kids ages 9 and under. Residents in their 60s also reported three new cases, while those in their 70s reported one.

Percent-positivity rate: The state’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked down from 5.5% to 5.3%. In Northern Virginia, Prince William Health District reported the highest rate, with 7.2%, which was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 6.5%. Both were lower than the day before.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole also ticked down from 5.6% to 5.4%

The Southwest and Eastern regions led the state with rates of 6.1%. They were followed by Northern Virginia.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported two new hospitalizations on Thursday involving one resident in their 20s and one in their 30s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Thursday rose from 916 to 982, up 66.

There were 219 patients in intensive care units, up four, as well as 112 on ventilators, down one. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Updated ZIP Code data was not immediately available on the VDH website on Thursday.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Thursday, Sept. 23: Prince William adds 35 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District reported 35 new COVID-19 cases as well as the hospitalization of a resident in their 20s. But no additional local deaths were reported on Wednesday, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Meanwhile, the local health district’s seven-day, average percent-positivity rate on local tests ticked down again on Wednesday to 7.5%, the lowest level since early July. Still, Prince William’s rate remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 580 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Wednesday as well as 43 new hospitalizations and 29 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday and now stands at 3,089.

Local deaths: The latest local deaths, those of a man and a woman, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older, were reported on Tuesday and brought the local death toll due to the pandemic to 233.

The Prince William Health District has reported 10 deaths since Saturday, Sept. 19. They included those of a resident in their 20s as well as those in their 60s, 70s and 80 or older, according to VDH data.

The VDH has reported a backlog of deaths that occurred over the past three to four weeks but were reported to the VDH dashboard only recently.

Prince William County has so far lost 201 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, seven.

Local victims include 134 men and 99 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 59 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 35 new cases reported in the health district on Wednesday, 32 were in Prince William County, two were in Manassas and one was in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s, 30s and 50s reported the most new cases on Wednesday with nine in each age group. They were followed by kids and teens ages 10 to 19, who reported five new cases.

Kids ages 9 and under reported no additional cases on Wednesday.

Residents in their 40s and 60s reported one new cases in each age group.

Percent-positivity rate: The state’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests remained steady at 5.5%. In Northern Virginia, Prince William Health District reported the highest rate, with 7.5%, which was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 6.8%.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 6% to 5.6%.

The Southwest region continues to lead the state with an average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests with 6.4%. The Southwest region was followed by Northern Virginia.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported one new hospitalizations on Wednesday involving a resident in their 20s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Wednesday fell from 940 to 916, down 24.

There were 215 patients in intensive care units, up two, as well as 113 on ventilators, unchanged from Tuesday. About 21% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 reported the most new cases on Wednesday with 10. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191, which reported seven new cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Tuesday, Sept. 22: Prince William reports 2 more COVID-19 deaths, adds 73 new cases

The Prince William Health District reported the deaths of two more residents due to the COVID-19 pandemic on Tuesday. They included one man and one woman, one in their 70s and one age 80 or older.

Meanwhile the county health district reported 73 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday as well as one new hospitalization. The local health district’s seven-day, average percent-positivity rate on local tests fell to 7.6%, the lowest level since early July, but remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 872 new COVID-19 cases statewide on Tuesday as well as 62 new hospitalizations and 39 additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday and now stands at 3,060.

Local deaths: The latest deaths bring the local death toll due to the pandemic to 233.

The Prince William Health District has reported 10 deaths since Saturday, Sept. 19. They included those of one resident in their 20s as well as those as those in their 60s, 70s and 80 or older, according to VDH data.

The VDH has reported a backlog of deaths that occurred over the last three to four weeks but were reported to the VDH dashboard only recently.

Prince William County has so far lost 201 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, seven.

Local victims include 134 men and 99 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 59 were in their 70s and 87 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 73 new cases reported in the health district on Tuesday, 61 were in Prince William County and 12 were in Manassas. The number of cases in Manassas Park was adjusted down by one.

Residents in their 30s reported the most new cases on Tuesday with 15. They were followed by residents in their 50s, who reported 14 new cases and then by those in their 20s with 12 new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported five new cases, while those age 9 and under also reported five.

Residents in their 40s reported eight new cases, while those in their 60s reported six. Residents in their 70s and those age 80 or older reported three in each age group.

Percent-positivity rate: Percent-positivity rates were down across the state on Tuesday. Statewide, the rate dipped from 5.7% to 5.5%.

The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate fell from 7.8% to 7.6%. In Northern Virginia, it was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 6.5%.

Northern Virginia’s rate as a whole ticked down from 6.2% to 6%.

The Southwest region continues to lead the state with an average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests with 6.7%. The Southwest region was followed by Northern Virginia.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported one new hospitalizations on Tuesday involving a resident in their 40s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Tuesday rose from 939 to 940, up one.

There were 213 patients in intensive care units on Tuesday, down four, as well as 113 on ventilators, up seven. About 19% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Updated ZIP Code data was not immediately available from the VDH on Tuesday.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Monday, Sept. 21: Prince William reports 32 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The Prince William Health District added 32 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday — a marked decrease from previous days — as well as two new hospitalizations. For the second day in a row, however, the health district reported no new deaths.

Also, the Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests dipped on Monday from 8% to 7.8% but remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Virginia added 627 new COVID-19 cases statewide as well as 22 new hospitalizations and six additional deaths. The state’s death toll due to the pandemic topped 3,000 on Sunday and now stands at 3,021.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District reported a total of eight deaths in the past week, including three reported on Saturday, Sept. 19: a resident in their 20s and two in their 60s. The three included two men and one woman. The local death toll due to the pandemic now numbers 231.

On Wednesday, Sept. 16, three deaths were reported involving two women and one man. All were residents of the county. One was in their 60s, and two were age 80 or older, according to VDH data.

On Tuesday, Sept. 15, two local fatalities were reported: those of two men, one of whom was in his 70s and one who was age 80 or older.

The eight recent fatalities are among what the VDH said was a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the last three to four weeks but were reported to the VDH dashboard this week.

Prince William County has so far lost 199 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, seven.

Local victims include 133 men and 98 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 58 were in their 70s and 86 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 32 new cases reported in the health district on Monday, 29 were in Prince William County, one was in Manassas and two were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s reported the most new cases on Monday with 13. They were followed by residents in their 30s, who reported seven new cases and then by kids age 9 and under who reported five.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported three new cases, as did residents in their 40s. Residents in their 50s and 60s reported two new cases in each age group.

Percent-positivity rate: Percent-positivity rates were down across the state on Monday. Statewide, the rate dipped from 5.9% to 5.7%.

The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate fell from 8% to 7.8% on Monday, but remains the highest in Northern Virginia. It was followed by Loudoun County, which reported a rate of 7.6%, down from Sunday’s 7.9%.

Northern Virginia’s rate ticked down from 6.2% to 6%.

The Southwest region continues to lead the state with an average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests with 6.7%, down from Sunday’s 7.1%. The Southwest region is followed by Northern Virginia.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported two new hospitalizations on Monday involving one resident in their 40s and one in their 70s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Monday rose from 939 to 995, up 56.

There were 217 patients in intensive care units on Monday, down 46, as well as 106 on ventilators, down 20. About 20% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 reported the most new cases on Monday with eight. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and Manassas ZIP Code 20111, which each reported five new cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

Sunday, Sept. 20: State’s COVID-19 death toll tops 3,000, Prince William reports 78 new cases

The Prince William Health District added 78 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday as well as two new hospitalizations.

But after reporting three deaths Saturday, including that of a resident in their 20s, the local health district reported no new fatalities, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Virginia’s death toll topped 3,000 for the first time on Sunday as the state added 25 new deaths. The state also reported 856 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday as well as 29 new hospitalizations.

The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests held steady at 8% on Sunday and remains the highest in Northern Virginia.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District reported a total of eight deaths in the past week, including the three reported on Saturday, Sept. 19: a resident in their 20s and two in their 60s.

The three included two men and one woman. The local death toll due to the pandemic now numbers 231.

On Wednesday, Sept. 16, three deaths were reported involving two women and one man. All were residents of the county. One was in their 60s and two were age 80 or older, according to VDH data.

On Tuesday, Sept. 15, two local fatalities were reported: those of two men, one of whom was in his 70s and one who was age 80 or older.

The eight recent fatalities are among what the VDH said was a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the last three to four weeks but were just reported to the VDH dashboard this week.

Prince William County has so far lost 199 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, seven.

Local victims include 133 men and 98 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 58 were in their 70s and 86 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 78 new cases reported in the health district on Sunday, 66 were in Prince William County and 12 were in Manassas. There were no new cases reported in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s and 40s reported the most new cases on Sunday with 15 and 12, respectively.

They were followed by residents in their 30s, who reported 11 new cases.

Kids and teens ages 10 to 19 reported nine new cases. Kids age 9 and under reported six new cases.

Residents in their 50s reported eight new cases, while those in their 70s reported seven and those in their 60s reported five. Residents age 80 and older reported two new cases.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests remained 8% on Sunday. Loudoun County’s ticked down to 7.9%.

The next highest in Northern Virginia is Rappahannock Health District, which reported a rate of 6.3%. Rappahannock includes Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties as well as Fredericksburg.

The state’s seven-day average percent-positivity rate dipped from 6.2% to 5.9% on Sunday, while the rate in Northern Virginia ticked down from 6.4% to 6.2%.

The Southwest region continues to lead the state with an average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests of 7.1%. It is followed by Northern Virginia.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The Prince William Health District reported two new hospitalizations on Sunday involving one resident in their 30s and one in their 50s.

The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Sunday fell from 960 to 939, down 21.

There were 263 patients in intensive care units, up 44, as well as 126 on ventilators, up 18. About 19% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 reported the most new cases on Sunday with 17. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 and 22192, which reported 12 new cases each.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen over the past week in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times analysis32

Saturday, Sept. 19: Prince William loses its first resident in their 20s to COVID-19, adds 3 deaths

The Prince William Health District has lost its first resident in their 20s to COVID-19. The fatality was one of three reported in the health district on Saturday, Sept. 19.

The other two deaths involved residents in their 60s. Of the three new fatalities, two were men and one was a woman. The local death toll due to the pandemic now numbers 231.

Meanwhile, Prince William County reported 63 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday and 70 new cases on Friday. The health district also reported four new hospitalizations over the last two days, including those of a residents in their 20s, 30s, 50s and 60s, according to VDH data.

Meanwhile, 953 new COVID-19 cases were reported across the state on Saturday, as well as 42 new hospitalizations and 38 more deaths.

Local deaths: The Prince William Health District reported a total of eight deaths in the past week, including the three reported on Saturday.

On Wednesday, Sept. 16, three deaths were reported involving two women and one man. All were residents of the county. One was in their 60s and two were age 80 or older, according to VDH data.

On Tuesday, Sept. 15, two local fatalities were reported: those of two men, one of whom was in his 70s and one who was age 80 or older.

The eight recent fatalities are among what the VDH said was a “backlog” of deaths that occurred over the last three to four weeks but were just reported to the VDH dashboard this week.

Prince William County has so far lost 199 residents since the start of the pandemic, while Manassas has lost 25 and Manassas Park, seven.

Local victims include 133 men and 98 women; one was in their 20s; two were in their 30s, eight were in their 40s, 21 were in their 50s, 55 were in their 60s, 58 were in their 70s and 86 were age 80 or older.

Local outbreaks: The health district reported its latest outbreak on Friday, Sept. 11, in a long-term care center. The location of that outbreak, however, has not yet been posted on the VDH website. Outbreaks in the county number 22.

Local cases: Of the 63 new cases reported in the health district on Saturday, 61 were in Prince William County and two were in Manassas Park.

Residents in their 20s and 30s reported the most new cases on Saturday with 11 in each age group.

They were followed by kids and teens ages 10 to 19 who reported 10 new cases. Kids age 9 and under reported four new cases.

Residents in their 40s and 50s reported seven new cases in each age group, while those in their 60s and 70s reported five in each group. Residents age 80 and older reported two new cases.

Percent-positivity rate: The Prince William Health District’s percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests ticked down to 8% on Saturday and is now tied with Loudoun County for the highest in Northern Virginia.

The two counties are followed by the Rappahannock Health District, which reported a rate of 6.9%. Rappahannock includes Caroline, King George, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties as well as Fredericksburg.

The state’s seven-day average percent-positivity rate dipped from 6.7% to 6.2% on Saturday, while the rate in Northern Virginia ticked down from 6.7% to 6.4%.

The Southwest region led the state with an average percent-positivity rate on COVID-19 tests of 7.1%, it was followed by Northern and Central Virginia, which posted rates of 6.4%.

The World Health Organization says a percent-positivity rate no higher than 10% indicates that enough tests are being performed to identify most cases of the disease.

The percent-positivity rate is one of the key measures Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration is watching to decide when the state is ready to move forward through Virginia’s reopening phases. The state entered Phase 3 on Wednesday, July 1.

Hospitalizations: The number of Virginians hospitalized for COVID-19 across the state on Saturday fell from 995 to 960, down 25.

There were 219 patients in intensive care units, down six, as well as 108 on ventilators, down one. About 19% of the state’s ventilators are currently in use, according to the Virginia Hospital and Healthcare Association.

ZIP Codes: Woodbridge ZIP Code 22193 reported the most new cases on Saturday with 17. It was followed by Woodbridge ZIP Code 22191 with 13 cases.

As of Saturday, Sept. 19, the seven-day average of new daily cases had fallen in nine of the county’s 20 ZIP Codes while remaining unchanged in eight.

The average number of daily cases over the past week rose in only three local ZIP Codes: 22191, 20110 and 22172, according to a Prince William Times GFN.

 

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Emerging Europe this week – Emerging Europe | Intelligence, Community, News

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Central Europe

Poland’s top court on Thursday ruled that abortions in cases of fetal defects are unconstitutional. Poland’s abortion laws were already among the strictest in Europe but the Constitutional Tribunal’s ruling will mean an almost total ban. Once the decision comes into effect, terminations will only be allowed in cases of rape or incest, or if the mother’s health is at risk. Rights groups had urged the government not to increase restrictions. The Council of Europe’s commissioner for human rights Dunja Mijatović said the ruling marked a “sad day for women’s rights”.

The Slovak parliament meanwhile on Tuesday narrowly rejected a motion by conservative lawmakers to tighten abortion rules, a proposal that was harshly criticized by women’s rights groups. The proposed amendment, defeated by a 59-58 margin, would have still allowed abortion on demand until 12 weeks into a pregnancy but would have doubled waiting periods to 96 hours, banned clinics from advertising services, and made women declare their reasons for termination.

Bulgaria’s government said on Wednesday it would challenge in court parts of a major EU-wide reform agreed earlier this year aimed at improving road haulers’ work conditions. The issue of road haulers’ work conditions has pitted eastern countries — also including Poland, Latvia, and Lithuania — against western states like France and Germany, who have backed the reform as a way to clamp down on so-called “social dumping” in the sector. The Bulgarian government said that it would challenge in particular rules that oblige long-haul drivers to return home with their vehicles at certain intervals as well as the ban on drivers taking their weekly rest periods in their trucks.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán’s government has asked local health experts to look into the efficiency of Covid-19 vaccines developed by Russia and China for possible later purchases, Mr. Orbán’s chief of staff said on Thursday. Gergely Gulyas told a press briefing that Hungary was ready to buy from the vaccines if they provide efficient protection against coronavirus. He said Hungary had also committed to buying 6.5 million vaccines from AstraZeneca at a cost of 13 billion forints (36.63 million euros) under a wider European Union agreement.

Croatia’s economy ministry has awarded three local companies exploration licenses for geothermal water deposits for electricity production, the country’s Hydrocarbon Agency (CHA) confirmed this week. The permits were granted for exploration works at four blocks located in the area of Slavonija, Podravina, and Medjumurje in the Drava river valley, in the country’s northeast, CHA said in a statement. The three companies are Geo Power Energy Development, Ensolx, and Buko Termal.

The turnover of the game development industry in Romania, which includes over 100 local studios, exceeded 200 million US dollars for the first time in 2019, according to an annual study carried out by RGDA (the Romanian Game Developers’ Association). The industry’s turnover rose by 14.7 percent compared to 2018. The industry now employs more than 6,000 people, with well-known games created in Romania including Ubisoft’s Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon: Breakpoint and EA’s FIFA 2020.

Eastern Europe

Belarus’s democratic opposition has been awarded the European Parliament’s 2020 Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought. “It is an honor to announce that the women and men of the democratic opposition in Belarus are the 2020 Sakharov Prize laureates,” European Parliament President David Sassoli told European lawmakers. “I would like to congratulate the representatives of the Belarusian opposition for their courage, resilience, and determination that they have been showing every day in defense of the freedom of thought and expression. This is what the Sakharov Prize is awarded for,” Sassoli said. The award will go to several opposition figures, including presidential candidate Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, her campaign manager Maria Kolesnikova, as well as Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich and Tsikhanovskaya’s imprisoned husband Serghei Tikhanovsky.

Optimism that upcoming talks in Washington will quell fighting between Azerbaijani and ethnic Armenian forces over the breakaway region of Nagorno-Karabakh appeared to dim this week as the two sides engaged in new battles and leaders in Baku and Yerevan hardened their positions. Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev said in an interview published on October 22 that the prospects for reaching a peace settlement were “very remote.” The day before, Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan said that he could see no diplomatic solution to the long-running conflict at this stage.

Ukrainian state gas company Naftogaz has welcomed new US sanctions against the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline, which now targets services and funding to pipe-laying vessels. The US Department of State on Tuesday published expanded guidelines on sanctions under the Protecting Europe’s Energy Security Act (PEESA). The guidance now covers “foreign firms or persons who provide certain services or goods that are necessary or essential to the provision or operation of a vessel engaged in the process of pipe-laying for such projects.” The Ukrainian firm added it will continue working closely with partners in Washington, Brussels, Berlin, and elsewhere “to ensure that Nord Stream 2 is never completed.”

Moldova’s government this week announced the creation of a national working group to coordinate the implementation of cross-border and transnational cooperation programs financed by the European Union. The group will be made up of representatives of key ministries, as well as representatives of the country’s National Anticorruption Centre. The working group will contribute to ensuring that European Union funds are used effectively, as well as combatting fraud.

The European Parliament this week confirmed that it will not send an election observation mission to Georgia for the country’s parliamentary elections due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The European Parliament has paused several external activities due to the pandemic, including observation missions. Georgia had requested the presence of EaP observers in September, promising their safety would be ensured. The election is set to be held on October 31.

North-East Europe

Joe Biden’s presidential campaign has presented his vision for US relations with the Baltic states, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, putting emphasis on “sending a strong signal to Russia” to not “bully a NATO member”. Michael Carpenter, a senior director of the Penn Biden Center at the University of Pennsylvania, shared a series of documents on his Twitter account, outlining the Biden campaign’s bids to a number of European countries, including Poland, Ukraine, and Greece. The document for the Baltic states points out that as vice president of the Barack Obama administration, Biden was the point-person on Baltic security.

The Riga Ghetto Museum, one of the Latvian capital’s three Holocaust museums, is facing possible closure after the city’s government decided to begin charging it around 10,000 euros in rent per month. The museum’s previous 10-year lease, which expired this year, did not charge any rent. The city has also reclaimed part of the land that the museum had been originally given, according to the head of the institution that runs the museum. “We cannot accept that in our country money is worth more than the memory of our ancestors,” Shamir Association head Rabbi Menachem Barkahan said in a statement on Wednesday. The Ghetto Museum, which opened in 2010, features a memorial wall that carries the names of over 70,000 Latvian Jews who fell victims to the Holocaust, and the names of a further 25,000 Jews from other European countries who were brought to Riga to be murdered.

Lithuania this week announced that it has granted more than 500 visas to Belarusian citizens fleeing the regime of dictator Alexander Lukashenko. “The figure is constantly changing and we are issuing permits to come to Lithuania every day,” Interior Minister Rita Tamašunienė said in a statement. “As protests show no signs of calming down, more and more people are deciding to leave Belarus.” The Belarusian opposition leader Svetlana Tikhanovskaya has herself been in exile in Lithuania since the beginning of the crisis, in August, following a rigged presidential election that Mr. Lukashenko claims to have won.

Southeast Europe

Serbian President Aleksandar Vučić this week announced that early parliamentary elections will be held in April 2022, even though a new government has still has not been formed following the previous elections in June. After a session of his ruling Serbian Progressive Party presidency, Vučić said the yet-to-be-formed new government will be of limited duration, adding that new elections will be held on April 3, 2022, at the latest, jointly with regular presidential elections. Local elections in the capital Belgrade will also be held that year, presumably at the same time as the presidential and parliamentary elections.

The European Investment Bank (EIB) and Erste Bank Novi Sad (EBS) have agreed on a 30 million euros loan to enable the strong recovery of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and mid-caps in Serbia in response to the Covid-19-induced contraction. The loan will allow EBS to on-lend to companies severely affected by the pandemic, helping them retain jobs, preserve liquidity, and ensure business continuity. This is the first operation in Serbia as part of the EIB’s 400 million euros financial program earmarked for the private sector in the Western Balkans to ensure a fast response to and recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic, as announced at the EU-Western Balkans Summit held in Zagreb in April 2020.

Albania and Greece say they have agreed to refer a dispute over maritime borders in the Ionian Sea to the International Court of Justice. The joint decision was announced by the two countries during a visit to Tirana by Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias. “We have agreed to pass on this case to international justice,” Dendias said after a meeting with Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama. Mr. Rama added that taking the case to The Hague would “(join) the dots based on the (court’s) expertise and international maritime law”. Greece has recently increased efforts to delimitate its sea borders, amid high tensions with Turkey over offshore energy exploration rights in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Bosnian prosecutors have charged the country´s secret service chief with abuse of power for allegedly using agency resources to spy on a man who filed a criminal complaint against him. The prosecutors’ office said in a statement on Thursday that Intelligence Security Agency head Osman Mehmedagic, together with the agency’s Cyber Security director Muhamed Pekic, allegedly sought to obtain information and photographs concerning the man. The two officials were also charged with violating the right to privacy of postal communication, the statement added. It provided no details on the man allegedly placed under surveillance, or on the nature of his complaint against Mehmedagic.

German Ambassador to Kosovo Jorn Rohde has criticized the Prishtina for disbanding its anti-corruption task force. “Sadly, the government’s decision to disband the anti-corruption task force raises concerns about the political will to tackle corruption issues effectively,” Mr. Rohde wrote on Twitter. Disbanding the task force has also been criticized by Kosovo’s civil society, the EU, and EULEX. Kosovo Prime Minister Abdullah Hoti has said that the task force, which investigates high-level corruption, was disbanded because it was unconstitutional.

Central Asia

Kyrgyzstan’s parliament voted on Thursday to delay an election to await a constitutional reform promoted by acting president Sadyr Japarov, a move that boosts his chances of staying on as full-time leader. They were rocked by protests this month against the results of a parliamentary election, which awarded most seats to two establishment parties. Protesters seized government buildings and forced the cabinet and president Sooronbai Jeenbekov to resign and the vote to annul. They also released Mr. Japarov from prison, allowing him first to be elected prime minister then to take over as acting president.

Uzbekistan’s President Shavkat Mirziyoev this week issued a decree to hasten the full transition of the Uzbek language from the Cyrillic to the Latin alphabet. The decree outlines language policy for the 2020-30 period as the country continues an on-again, off-again attempt to reform the Uzbek language and widen its use. One pillar of the decree calls on the government to create a road map for a full transition to the Uzbek alphabet based on the Latin alphabet. Uzbek was written in an Arabic script until the late 1920s, then Latin, before the Soviet Union introduced Cyrillic in 1940.

Around 900,000 chickens, geese and ducks have died in Kazakhstan as the result of an outbreak of avian flu that has swept across the country this autumn. The die-off has reportedly caused a shortfall of poultry and eggs from markets in the capital, although there is no evidence of shortages anywhere else. The infections look to have arrived from Russia. On August 3, the Russian agricultural regulator, known as Rosselkhoznadzor, announced it had detected an outbreak of avian flu in the Chelyabinsk region, which borders Kazakhstan. The virus subtype H5N8 was found in the carcasses of a wild duck and four domestic ducks and geese, the regulator said.

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Health

Notes on My Colon Cancer

Mish Boyka

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The giant robot looks like a WED Treadwell, my favorite robot of all the Star Wars droids. I admit, I was worried that it would look organic, like a Sentinel from The Matrix, with wriggling Dr. Octopus arms and pinchy pincers that pinch. But I’m calmed by the robot’s EVE-like exterior.

The room is sterile. A dozen masked, gloved attendants in blue buzz. I imagine I’m an astronaut about to step into the rocketship capsule.

Except I won’t be going anywhere on this particular journey, unless something goes very, very wrong. In fact, I’ve already been asked repeatedly by various staffers to describe what I’m expecting to happen in this room over the next few hours:

“I’m here to remove my sigmoid colon via robotic surgery because of the cancerous tumor inside.”

I’m 34 years old. It’s October 12th, 2020. Five weeks ago I was diagnosed with colon cancer.

Stool, bloody stool

I’ve always been a standing wiper. Not sure entirely why. I must have once, accidentally, touched a load of poo during a seated wipe. That sort of thing can change a person.

This charming anecdote does factor into our story, because it means I’ve always had a pretty good sense for my poo. Consistency, quality, and color, both in the bowl and on the TP. Did you know, there’s even a seven-stage scientific classification system for your poo, called the Bristol stool scale?!



Bristol stool scale

I first noticed blood two or three years ago. On a monthly or so cadence, I’d wipe and notice a reddish tinge. Not bright red, more like muddy-red. Poopy-red. Initially, I thought little of it. Just a minor curiousity. It certainly didn’t happen every time. Still, I decided to check off the Blood in stool box on the forms at my annual physical with my primary care doctor that year.

A brief aside on the phrase “your primary care doctor.” Like in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, the last doctor I really thought of as “my doctor” was my pediatrician. Since “becoming an adult”, I’ve lived in three cities in two countries, which means that’ve generally had no idea who my primary care doctor is or was, only that I’d need to find one to give me a referral to get this wart on my foot removed.



Firetruck

Anyway, this season’s Dr. Who told me not to worry about the blood. “It’s probably hemorrhoids.”

WTF is a hemorrhoid? I wondered to myself as I said to him, “Sounds good.” Googled it after, and I learned that it’s a vein that pokes out a little in your butt and doesn’t really want to be poking out a little, so it bleeds. Seems like a thing that can happen, so I more or less returned to regularly scheduled programming and just dealt with the occasional poopy-red wipe. This doc also said I probably don’t need to come for a physical for a few years, that annual physicals are a myth, dry land in a water world.

Fast-forward to 2020. Everything sucks. And the bloody wipes are making a resurgence. Because, of course, they are. About four months ago I noticed that my first poop of the day (I usually go 2x) would have this purple-red streak embedded in it, like a racing stripe from hell. And it would happen almost without fail every single morning. That just didn’t seem right, no matter what Doctors of Physicals Past told me. And then one morning I felt like I had actual blood dripping from my butt.

Now I consider myself to be a mostly healthy person. I eat fairly well (even though I enjoy the occasional sourdough loaf and hazy IPA), I run and bike and hike regularly, I ran an IRONMAN in 2016 and a few ultramarathons since. I also don’t like being sick (who does?). But, like with most things in my life, I want to be “good” at health. An ideal dental appointment for me would go something like this, “Wow, Charlie, these are the straightest, whitest teeth we’ve ever seen. We’d like you to come in and be the model for our Instagram ads and also be our 3D teeth model for dentures. Congratulations. Here’s two free toothbrushes. You also never need to floss again.”

Anything that deviates from that ideal makes me squirm and I do think I can fix anything. For what it’s worth I still believe that, if I ever encounter a blue flower on a mountain-top, I’m only a few months of mystical training away from becoming Batman. I already have the cape (it’s actually a Harry Potter robe, but, hey, I’m scrappy).

At the same time, I counterweight this with a mild touch of hypochondria. I’ll see the poison oak in the mistletoe, so to speak. In this case it was a gift. I googled again for stool, bloody stool and the dreaded colon cancer came back. Last time, I averted my eyes from these search results. But the bloody racing stripes weren’t going away. I needed to get myself checked out.

Then I remembered an email from work: I was eligible for a OneMedical membership. I knew there was hype about OneMedical, certainly I’ve seen the billboards, but I still wasn’t exactly sure what they were all about. It had been a few years since my last physical, as you know, so I was primary-care-less, with a bloody problem on my hands. I downloaded the OneMedical app, uploaded a photo of my insurance card, beep-boop, and I’ve got an appointment with a new doc in a few days in one of their nearby clinics. Already, I loved the experience – I could text my questions any time (see foot wart above). I’d describe OneMedical as a network of clinics with an app for scheduling appointments and texting with a doc. Sure, ZocDoc kinda does the scheduling thing, but Zocdoc feels like you’re sifting through the classifieds. Gimme some non-user-generated-ratings-based curation, please.

So, I met with the doc, liked him a lot, discussed my bloody poops, and sheepishly asked if he’d be my new primary care. He agreed, and he also referred me to UCSF for a colonoscopy. Sure, I’m young, and it’s probably hemorrhoids, we agreed, but it’s the only way to be sure.

After some jiggling about with the referral documentation, we finally get the colonoscopy scheduled for a few weeks later on Sept 9th.

Then, on August 28th, Chadwick Boseman died of complications from colon cancer.

I wasn’t freaked out. Okay, yes, I was very freaked out.

Colonoscopies are not bad

What’s a colonoscopy? It’s a surgical procedure where the doctor goes all the way up your butt to see what’s going on in there. You are completely knocked out, so you feel nothing. The only thing you need to do is what we in the business like to call “bowel prep.”

Allow me to describe bowel prep: the day before the procedure, you will poop your ever-living guts out for a few hours until you are clean-as-a-whistle, stem to stern. They’ll give you a prescription for a gigantic jug of clear laxatives that you’ll drink every 15 minutes or so for a few hours. In today’s toilet-paper hoarding economy, I’d make sure that you are stocked up, because this gets messy.

Other then the laxatives, you’re allowed to drink clear liquids – which is confusing because you can enjoy such clear liquids as black coffee, Gatorade, broth, even green jello.

But that’s it. Easy. I watched Stranger Things season 3 again during my bowel prep day. Might not have been the best choice, as I intermittently had to pause Netflix to contribute my own liquified form of the Mind-Flayer, but it got the job done, and I cried my way thru Dustin and Suzie’s hymn to childhood, again, as expected.

Okay, next, I woke up on September 9th. My appointment is around 2 PM. Normal day, right?



sf

Nope.

I decide to walk over to the UCSF Parnassus building in the creepy Mars firelight, imagining I’m the last man on Earth (and hoping I don’t step on my reading glasses). Carly makes a plan to pick me up in a few hours in our car.

As expected, the procedure was painless. My only bit of further colonoscopy advice here is to ALWAYS bring a book with you, to every single medical appointment you have, because there’s always going to be some sort of delay or waiting room.

An hour or so later, I woke up feeling the feels of that post-anesthesia giddiness. Except no one else was happy. Carly was in the room, a surprise to me. And my doctor looked quite serious.

In addition to two small polyps (which she removed), my colonoscopy surgeon found a tumor in my sigmoid colon. At this point, I don’t know a sigmoid colon from a semi-colon, but I knew it wasn’t good news. Go 2020!

Despite the odds (my youth, my health), I now had cancer. Well, I probably had it for awhile, but we just found out I had it.

My doc said I’d need to meet with UCSF’s colorectal surgery team, and I’d also need to get CT scans (“cat scans”) to see if the cancer had spread anywhere else in my body.

And so began one of the worst weeks of our lives.

A brief family history

Let’s talk about the odds for a moment.

odds

We’ve already discussed my vigorous, proto-Batman level of health. And how I’m a fresh-faced, occasionally-bearded, 34 year old with the heart of a child and the strength of a chimpanzee (no, that’s a humanzee).

Speaking of unfortunate genetics, it turns out that I have some family history of colon cancer.

Here’s the scoop: my pops (that’s cool talk for Dad) has had benign (non-cancerous) polyps in his previous colonoscopies. What’s a poylp? It’s a little growth thingy in your colon that may evolve into a tumor. Just like how a Charmander becomes a Charmeleon, polyps can grow bigger and more serious with more destructive power. Polyps are usually just snipped out during your colonoscopy and sent off for pathology (aka to see if they have cancer in them). Most do not. This is the case with my dad’s polyp experience. Even though none of his have been cancerous, he still needs to go in for colonoscopies more regularly than those who don’t have polyps.

My own tumor began as a lowly polyp, perhaps some ten years ago. We don’t know exactly. But if I’d had a colonoscopy ten years ago, or five years ago, they might have seen it and snipped it out and you wouldn’t be reading this.

If you go further up the Harrington tree, you’ll learn that my dad’s aunt (my father’s mother’s sister) died of colon cancer in her early 60s. And his other aunt (same side, same family) died of colon cancer in her 80s. Two factoids that I had no idea about until I asked my parents for their help filling out one of the many UCSF cancer history surveys. Also, on my mom’s side, my grandfather’s mother (my great-grandmother, who I never met) probably had colon cancer.

So, colon cancer is bouncing around in my family tree. But neither of my parents have it, and none of my grandparents had it, which I suppose is good. That said, I learned that my grandparents did have other sorts of cancers.

Getting confusing, right? I cannot stress this enough: Learn your family’s medical history and write it down in a note on your phone. You’ll be asked for this info 10,000 times before every single appointment. But, more importantly, your family history can be a signal to you and your docs whether are “higher-risk” for certain conditions.

I just didn’t know about any of this. I knew there were some heart attacks in there, but not really about any of the cancer stuff. Ideally, each person would be given some sort of family history report when they’re born or when they turn 18 or when they get their first Nintendo.

But that’s just it. You don’t get health info automatically. There’s no one, other than you, to own your medical health story. You must become your own health advocate. Spoiler alert, but this is the number one lesson I learned during this entire cancer experience. Health literacy is just as important as financial literary or literacy literacy.

There are tools to help, and I’m still digging into them now. I’m much more excited now by the Apple Health stuff on iOS. I’m hoping it can become some sort of private, secure repository for my health data that I carry with me. For example, how many of you, dear readers, know your blood type? There’s all sorts of little info-nuggets that you can track down NOW to pay-it-forward for FUTURE you. Cause, ain’t nobody else gonna. It’s like a scavenger hunt. Okay, enough proselytizing, dude.

Stage-wise limbo

Back to our story, we’ve just learned that I have a cancerous tumor up my butt and we’ve also filled out a few frightening family history reports. This is where UCSF kicks it into high gear (and, my goodness, do I love UCSF? Yes, yes I do. They are absolutely, amazingly wonderful, competent, and life-changing!).

I’m now starting to get booked for all sorts of appointments, starting with the ones previously mentioned: (1) CT scans of my abdomen and chest and (2) then the consult with the colorectal surgeon.

Because, as I later learned from my colorectal surgeon (who is the best!), when colon cancer spreads, it usually does the evolution thing from cancerous polyp (Stage 1) into tumor (Stage 2). After that, it can break through the wall of the colon into the nearby lymph nodes (Stage 3). Finally, it becomes (Stage 4) if it spreads to other organs, the first often being the liver and the lungs. At least, this is how I understand the various stages. I’m sure I’m missing some technical details and nuance. When reading about Chadwick Boseman, you’ll learn that he was initially diagnosed with Stage 3 colon cancer in 2016, which eventually became Stage 4. In sum, you want your stage to be as low as possible.

At this point, pre-CT scan, Carly and I have no idea what stage I’m at. Well, we do know that I’m somewhere from 2 – 4. These appointments are going to help us understand where I’m at. Specifically, the CT scans will tell us if I’m Stage 4 or not.

Carly and I are in a daze for most of the next week. And so are our parents and our siblings. I honestly can’t remember how many friends we told at this point, I know a few, but not that many. I didn’t know what to say or feel.

Much like the South Park lament “The Simpsons did it!”, there’s usually an xkcd for whatever you’re feeling or thinking:

emotions

As a wannabe stoic, I allow my negative visualization to run rampant. I’m thinking of the possibility that I’ve got only a few years (months?) left to live.

My CT scans are scheduled for Thursday afternoon and the meeting with the surgeon is Friday morning. Between then and now, we have the horrible Internet to do horrible searches and we have the two-page summary printout of my colonoscopy, replete with some terrifying photos of the tumor. The tumor looks like a cross between a tadpole and an eyeball (two things that I’d normally love). I don’t like looking at this picture, at all, but the two-page summary somehow keeps traveling around our house, and no matter where I look, I see the pink tadpole eye staring back at me, and I wonder, “Are you my death sentence?”

The sound of silence

On Thursday, Carly and I walk over to the UCSF CT scanning place. It’s slightly less hostile to human life outside today, so that’s nice. After checking in with the front desk, I quickly pass through the first waiting room into the second waiting room. There’s always a second waiting room.

It’s here I realize that the sound of a major health issue is rapidly opening and shutting hospital doors. I scribble this pithy witicism into the back cover of my paperback copy of Flow and wait my turn with the CT machine. I’m given two bottles of “contrast” provided by reknowned-drink-maker General Electric to drink. These iodine cocktails will help the machine see my inside stuff. They taste like you’re drinking printer ink. They’re not that bad at all. Everyone else in here is at least fifty years old. I decide to do a five minute wall-sit to prove my vigor. Finally, I’m called back to the machine.

The CT machine looks like a coldsleep chamber crossed with a Weyland Corporation interdimensional portal. It’s over in less than a minute.

Plan of attack

The scans are done and now it’s up to the radiologist to read them. I’m sure some neat TensorFlow or PyTorch deep learning computer vision model could help here, but I don’t have access to the dataset.

The next morning we drive over to the UCSF Center for Colorectal Surgery. It’s in the beautiful ghost town of the greater Chase Center-Mission Bay area. I look up at the sun before heading in, thinking, “The next time I see you, ball of gas burning billions of miles away (quoth Pumbaa), we’ll know the CT results and we’ll know the plan.”

When I see the sun again, we do.

The CT scans were clean. There’s no sign that the cancer spread to other organs, ruling out Stage 4. This is the best news ever.

The second best news we hear is that the tumor is in a relatively excellent spot for surgery. After an impromptu rectal exam that morning (hello!) to make sure there was no cancer in the rectum, my surgeon gives us an overview of the situation and a plan of attack.

He’s going to remove my entire sigmoid colon (which is about a foot long), and then simply reattach the rectum to the rest of the colon. And he’s going to do this all via “robotic surgery” (using the WED Treadwell-like da Vinci Surgical System), so the scars will be teeny and the recovery much easier.

We’ll only be able to tell if I’m Stage 2 or Stage 3 post-surgery. He’s planning to remove the nearby lymph nodes and a pathology report will tell us if they’re cancerous. If they’re positive, it’s Stage 3.

But, either way, we’re getting this thing out of my butt, pronto.

Carly and I have a plan. We’re planners. We needed this. A bit of our haze is lifted as we head into our next agenda item.

Gettin’ hitched

We got married (eloped, both technically and social-distanced-ly) on Sept. 30th!



wedding

Look at those oblivious smiles. Wait — we aren’t oblivious, I have cancer. We just love eachother.

Originally slated for 2019, then after bouncing around in 2020, our cute elopement threaded a very small needle with a teeny ceremony and it was beautiful and wonderful and just what we hoped for.

Now, onto our first act as a married couple: my surgery on Monday, Oct 12th (and another round of bowel prep the day before).

Surgery ain’t no joke

I don’t have much to add about the surgery itself. I was there. But I don’t remember anything. Thank goodness. I also haven’t yet watched any YouTubes of how the da Vinci robot works. I didn’t want to know before the surgery, and I’m not quite ready now to see it.

I did remember to bring a book, though:



book

And, then, after glimpsing my many-limbed robotic friend in the surgery room, it’s lights out.

The next thing I know it’s five hours later and I’m in a hospital bed and calling Carly to give her my room number. The nurses in the recovery area are amazing. I’m hooked up to an IV and they’re monitoring my “ins” and my “outs” (my foods and my pees and poops). They do this every four hours, so you’re not exactly going to get a perfect night’s sleep here, but it’s great to know that they’re paying good attention to you.

The big goal for me for the next 24 hours is to walk around. Being the Big Hero 6 that I am, I try to walk at 9 PM on the day of my surgery (which concluded around 6 PM), and I stand up, but my heart starts racing, so I slowly plop back into bed. Then, at midnight, my nurse helps my try again, and I do it. I shuffle around the hallway like a zombie, wheeling along my IV stand. It’s a huge win. I end up walking six more times that day, between many Breath of the Wild sessions and most of The Umbrella Academy Season 2.

Sure, my guts feel like someone took a blender to them, but I’m in great spirits, with incredible support from the UCSF team, Carly, and my mom.

Side note that IVs are interesting. They’re like open ports into your body, allowing the medical team can either remove or add fluids. I didn’t expect that they’d just keep these ports open during your hospital stay, but they do. I guess that makes sense.



port

Another secret weapon of mine that aided in my recovery: this cute avocado buddy that my sister and her boyfriend sent me:



avo

I’m squeezing this thing every time I’m jabbed with a needle (many, many times), using it as a pillow, and just loving it, cause it’s so cute.

On Wednesday, after I’ve started farting and pooping again (great signs!), I’m sent home early.

The future

I’m home and moving slow and still feel a bunch of surgical pain in my tummy, but overall feel so happy about my progress. I have some cool scars, which I’m thinking about submitting to the @secret_buttholes Instagram:



scars

On Thursday, I get a call from my surgeon. The pathology is back early. There’s no signs that the cancer spread past the colon walls. The lymph nodes don’t show any signs of cancer in them. Which essentially means I had Stage 2 cancer. Per my doctors, there’s no immediate need for chemotherapy.

We did it.

I still have some upcoming follow-up appointments, and meetings with cancer genetics to learn if I’m genetically predisposed to cancers. And I’m sure I’ll be doing many more colonoscopies and other tests in the future. And I’m still recovering from the surgery, too.

But I (think) I’m cancer-free now. Now, there’s no way to know that little microscopic cancer cells didn’t manage to break through somehow, or that I don’t have cancer in some other random part of my body, so it’s kinda arbitrary to say something like “cancer-free.” But we do know, for sure, that my colon cancer tumor was safely removed and that my doctors are extremely pleased with the results and the signs that it hasn’t spread.

Hello, impostor’s syndrome, my old friend

So, I guess that means I’m a cancer survivor.

Which is weird to say, because this whole thing happened very quickly. All I did was “bowel prep” for two days and then fall asleep and wake up with a painful stomach.

But I am a survivor.

In fact, I’m probably the luckiest cancer survivor ever, from my access to incredible people and resources at UCSF to the actual state of my tumor to my family and friends support network. I paid attention to my body (noticing the bloody poops) and got the support and encouragement needed to get checked.

UCSF has me signed up for a 5+ year relationship with their cancer survivors unit (I’ll learn more in a few weeks when I have my first session). I’m excited about this, because I want to learn as much as I can about how to stay safe and healthy going forward. A few of my friends have told me that there’s good research into fasting and Keto and their link with preventing colon cancers. I’m queuing up some Tim Ferriss episodes with Dom D’Agostino about this topic.

My wife and my family are depending on me to stay healthy, and I’m going to do everything I can to do so. I’m going to own health and be my own health advocate.

Some thanks

It’s now about a week and half out from my surgery. I’m doing better on the Bristol scale, but not quite back to normal yet.



walking

Monday was my surgery. Tuesday didn’t capture my walks, because I didn’t have my phone on me. But I’m moving around again, and eager to get back to regularly-scheduled life.

Thank you for reading this story. I hope it is informative and shocking and helps you think about your health and the health of those around you. For example, Molly – my sister – is definitely going to have to get a colonoscopy ASAP.

Thank you to:

  • My incredible, magical, beautiful wife Carly!
  • My parents and my mother-in-law and our siblings!
  • Our friends and family!
  • UCSF!
  • OneMedical!

Also, if I got anything wrong in this missive from a medical perspective, let me know and I can attept to correct the errata. This is meant to be my understanding of my situation, YMMV.

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Election

We analyzed a conservative foundation’s catalog of absentee ballot fraud. It’s not a 2020 election threat

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Leila and Gary Blake didn’t want to miss elk hunting season.

It was 2000, and the election conflicted with their plans, so the Wyoming couple requested absentee ballots.

But the Blakes had moved from 372 Curtis Street five miles down the road to 1372 Curtis Street, crossing a town line. When they mailed their votes using the old address, they were criminally charged. The misdemeanor case was settled with $700 in fines and a few months’ probation, but two decades later, the Blakes are still listed as absentee ballot fraudsters in the Heritage Foundation’s Election Fraud Database.

Far from being proof of organized, large-scale vote-by-mail fraud, the Heritage database presents misleading and incomplete information that overstates the number of alleged fraud instances and includes cases where no crime was committed, an investigation by USA TODAY, Columbia Journalism Investigations and the PBS series, FRONTLINE found.

Although the list has been used to warn against a major threat of fraud, a deep look at the cases in the list shows that the vast majority put just a few votes at stake.

Fox News host Sean Hannity has repeatedly touted the Heritage Foundation's database of election fraud cases.
Fox News host Sean Hannity has repeatedly touted the Heritage Foundation’s database of election fraud cases.

The database is the result of a years-long passion project by Hans von Spakovsky, a former member of the U.S. Department of Justice during the George W. Bush administration and a senior legal fellow with the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. The entire Election Fraud Database contains 1,298 entries of what the think tank describes as “proven instances of voter fraud.” It has been amplified by conservative media stars and was submitted to the White House document archives as part of a failed effort to prove that voter fraud ran rampant during the 2016 election.

But the Blakes’ address violation is typical of the kind of absentee ballot cases in the database. It appears along with widows and widowers who voted for a deceased loved one, voters confused by recent changes to the law and people never convicted of a crime.

The Heritage database does not include a single example of a concerted effort to use absentee ballot fraud to steal a major election, much less a presidential election, as President Donald Trump has suggested could happen this year. Though Trump has repeatedly claimed that absentee ballot fraud is widespread, only 207 of the entries in the Heritage database are listed under the fraudulent absentee ballot category. Not only is that a small slice of the overall Heritage database, it represents an even smaller portion of the number of local, state and national elections held since 1979, which is as far back as the database goes.

To examine the facts behind the rhetoric, reporters looked at each case in Heritage’s online category of “Fraudulent use of absentee ballots,” comparing them with state investigations, court documents and news clips. Roughly one in 10 cases involves a civil penalty and no criminal charge. Some of the cases, such as the one involving the Blakes, do not match the online definition of absentee fraud as stated by the Heritage Foundation itself. Four cases did not involve absentee ballots at all, including a 1996 murder-for-hire case that included a person persuaded to illegally vote using a wrong address.

A voter drops their ballot off during early voting, Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, in Athens, Ga.
A voter drops their ballot off during early voting, Monday, Oct. 19, 2020, in Athens, Ga.

In recent months, von Spakovsky has cited the database to warn about the dangers of voting by mail, including during podcast interviews with U.S. Rep. Dan Crenshaw and former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

In a written response for this story, von Spakovsky — the manager of the Heritage Foundation’s Election Law Reform Initiative — called the database “factual, backed up by proof of convictions or findings by courts or government bodies in the form of reports from reputable news sources and/or court records.”

He acknowledges that the database is elastic enough to pull in civil cases, as well as criminal cases closed with no conviction. “Some suffered civil sanctions. Others suffered administrative rebukes,” von Spakovsky said. In the case of criminal convictions, the database “does not discriminate between serious and minor cases.” Charges listed in the description “add the necessary context,” he wrote.

Even with such a broad definition, the Brennan Center for Justice in its 2017 examination of the full database found scant evidence supporting claims of significant, proven fraud. It did conclude the cases added up to “a molecular fraction” of votes cast nationwide. Von Spakovsky has countered that the database is a sampling of cases that have publicly surfaced.

“We simply report cases of which we become aware,” he said.

But if the Heritage database is a sample, it points to a larger universe of cases that are just as underwhelming.

“It illustrates that almost all of the voting fraud allegations tend to be small scale, individual acts that are not calculated to change election outcomes,” said Rick Hasen, election law author and professor of law and political science at the University of California, Irvine.

To be sure, there are exceptions. In North Carolina, a Republican political consultant was indicted and the results of a 2018 congressional race overturned based on an absentee ballot operation.

“But by and large the allegations are penny-ante,” Hasen said. “Some are not crimes at all.”

Relatively small number of votes at stake

Following unsubstantiated claims that “millions and millions” of fraudulent votes cast in the 2016 election had cost him the popular vote, Trump in 2017 created the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity to investigate stories of voter fraud.

Joining the panel was von Spakovsky, whose appointment was considered controversial. In an email obtained by the Campaign Legal Center, he urged that Democrats should be barred from the task force, arguing they would obstruct the panel’s work. He also wrote, of moderate Republicans: “There aren’t any that know anything about this or who have paid attention to the issue over the years.” He submitted the Heritage database almost immediately into the commission’s official documents.

The task force disbanded seven months after its first meeting with no report substantiating fraud. The White House blamed the potential cost of lawsuits and uncooperative states for the failure to produce evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Then-Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach met with Trump after the presidential election to propose an investigation into voter fraud. Trump established a commission to investigate, but ultimately disbanded it without any substantiated findings of widespread voter fraud.
Then-Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach met with Trump after the presidential election to propose an investigation into voter fraud. Trump established a commission to investigate, but ultimately disbanded it without any substantiated findings of widespread voter fraud.

A review of the absentee cases in the Heritage Foundation database helps explain why the panel came up short, and why such fraud is not a reasonable threat to undermine the 2020 general election.

In multiple instances, only one or two votes were involved. In other cases, no fraudulent votes were involved but are still included in the database because people ran afoul of rules on helping others fill out ballots or ballot requests. For example, a nursing home worker was civilly fined $100 because she did not sign her name and address as an “assistor” on ballots she helped four elderly patients fill out. In another case, a mother was fined $200 because she signed her sons’ requests for absentee ballots.

Events in the database also can be older than they seem because Heritage frequently categorizes entries by dates of an indictment, report or conviction, which may come years after the fraud. Using the year of the incident, 137 of 207 cases occurred before 2012.

Working in bipartisan pairs, canvassers process mail-in ballots in a warehouse at the Anne Arundel County Board of Elections headquarters on October 7, 2020 in Glen Burnie, Maryland. The ballot canvas for mail-in and absentee ballots began on October 1st in Maryland, the earliest in the country. Every ballot goes through a five step process before being sliced open and tabulated.
Working in bipartisan pairs, canvassers process mail-in ballots in a warehouse at the Anne Arundel County Board of Elections headquarters on October 7, 2020 in Glen Burnie, Maryland. The ballot canvas for mail-in and absentee ballots began on October 1st in Maryland, the earliest in the country. Every ballot goes through a five step process before being sliced open and tabulated.

Overall, the total number of absentee cases in the Heritage Foundation database is 153, with 207 entries in the category because multiple people are sometimes listed for the same case. Of those cases, 39 of them — involving 66 people — represent cases in which there seemed to be an organized attempt to tip an election, based on reporting and the group’s own description.

Further, the database describes “cases,” not individuals charged. However, the total number of cases became inflated after Heritage began counting every person involved in a criminal ring as a separate case.

“Each individual is a separate case and involved different … acts of voter fraud,” even if the parties conspired, von Spakovsky said. The Heritage Foundation may reconsider how groups of defendants are counted, but if anything, he said, the number of cases is undercounted, not overcounted.

But the details of the cases compiled in the database undermine the claim that voter fraud is a threat to election integrity.

In Seattle, an elderly widow and a widower appeared in court the same day, having voted for their recently deceased spouses — two of 15 in the database where an individual cast the ballot of a recently deceased parent, wife or husband. “The motivation in these cases was not to throw an election,” the prosecutor of the Seattle case told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. “The defendants are good and honorable people.”

Lorraine Minnite, a Rutgers University political science professor who has written extensively on voter behavior, said of the Heritage Foundation database: “They slapped it together.

“They must have thought people would not think about it in a deep way,” Minnite said. “They can just slam it on the desk, say some number. The context and accuracy goes out the window.”

Signage for ballots with errors is seen in a warehouse at the Anne Arundel County Board of Elections headquarters on October 7, 2020 in Glen Burnie, Maryland. The ballot canvas for mail-in and absentee ballots began on October 1st in Maryland, the earliest in the country. Every ballot goes through a five step process before being sliced open and tabulated.
Signage for ballots with errors is seen in a warehouse at the Anne Arundel County Board of Elections headquarters on October 7, 2020 in Glen Burnie, Maryland. The ballot canvas for mail-in and absentee ballots began on October 1st in Maryland, the earliest in the country. Every ballot goes through a five step process before being sliced open and tabulated.

Andrea “Andy” Bierstedt was accused of taking one ballot belonging to another voter to the post office in a 2010 Texas sheriff’s race. Campos said prosecutors allowed her to donate $3,500 to the county food bank as part of a plea. She wrote the check and she has no conviction. Yet she’s in the database.

“This database is really saying that I’m guilty when even the courts say I’m not guilty,” said Bierstedt, who did not know her name was on a compilation of voter fraud cases. “It’s slander.”

Others captured in the database stumbled on changes in law. Providing assistance, such as the delivery of an absentee ballot, had been legal in 2003 in Texas, and in 2004, that’s what Hardeman County Commission candidate Johnny Akers did. “I didn’t understand you couldn’t mail some little old lady’s ballot,” Akers told the Wichita Falls Times Record News.

After Brandon Dean won the Brighton, Alabama, 2016 mayor’s race, a losing candidate sued over absentee ballots.

“This isn’t about voting fraud,” the judge in the civil trial said. Ballots rejected by the judge for apparent voter mistakes triggered a runoff, and Dean declined to run.

Dean’s case, however, appears in the Heritage database.

Percy Gill’s re-election to the Wetumpka, Alabama town council the same year also prompted a rival to sue, and a civil judge also overturned the election because of defective absentee ballots. Gill died last year.

“I don’t know why they put him on the [Heritage] database,” said his friend Michael Jackson, the District Attorney for Alabama’s Fourth Judicial District. “He was a very honest man, an upstanding official.”

‘It wasn’t anything big to begin with’

The Heritage voter fraud database correctly notes that Miguel Hernandez was arrested as part of a larger voting fraud investigation in the Dallas area.

Hernandez, who pleaded guilty to improperly returning a marked ballot in a city council election, had knocked on voters’ doors, volunteered to request absentee ballots on their behalf, signed the requests under a forged name and then collected ballots for mailing.

A box of absentee ballots wait to be counted at the Albany County Board of Elections in Albany, N.Y. on June 30, 2020.
A box of absentee ballots wait to be counted at the Albany County Board of Elections in Albany, N.Y. on June 30, 2020.

But Heritage did not include the fact that the investigation went nowhere. Voters told prosecutors their mailed votes were accurately recorded.

“It did not materialize into anything bigger simply because it wasn’t anything big to begin with,” said Andy Chatham, a former Dallas County assistant district attorney who helped prosecute Hernandez. “This was not a voter fraud case.”

Yet according to the Heritage Foundation’s fraud database, Hernandez’s scheme involved up to 700 ballots.

“Absolutely hilarious,” said Bruce Anton, Hernandez’s defense attorney. “There is no indication that anything like that was ever, ever considered.”

The legend of Hernandez’s activities grew even more when U.S. Attorney General William Barr recently held Hernandez out as an example of fraud, boosting the number of ballots. “We indicted someone in Texas, 1,700 ballots collected, he — from people who could vote, he made them out and voted for the person he wanted to.”

The Department of Justice had not indicted Hernandez. A spokeswoman told reporters Barr had been given inaccurate information.

Fraud exists, and the system to catch it works

While fewer and farther between, legitimate absentee fraud is also reflected in the database. Ben Cooper and 13 other individuals faced 243 felony charges in 2006 in what was described as Virginia’s worst election fraud in half a century. The mayor of tiny Appalachia, Cooper and his associates stole absentee ballots and bribed voters with booze, cigarettes and pork rinds so that they could repeatedly vote for themselves.

But the case is an example of just how difficult it is to organize and execute absentee fraud on a scale significant enough to swing an election while also avoiding detection. Heritage’s compilation of known absentee cases show the schemes repeatedly occurred in local races, frequently in smaller towns where political infighting can be fierce and fraudsters easily identified. Just one voter who told her story to The Roanoke Times unraveled Cooper’s ring.

The idea that absentee fraud frequently involves few votes and is easily caught is “laughable,” von Spakovsky said. He cited as an example the 1997 Miami mayoral race, which was riddled with absentee fraud.

However, that fraud scheme also quickly collapsed: The election took place in November, the Miami Herald began exposing the fraud in December, a civil trial started in February and a judge overturned the election in March.

“There have been some ham-handed attempts in small scale fraud, but I would be very surprised to see large scale efforts that go undetected,” Hasen said. “It is very hard to fly under the radar.”

The Heritage database also illustrates an aggressive system capable of catching and harshly punishing violators. When a Washington state woman registered her dog and put his paw print on an absentee ballot, she risked felony charges. Forging his ex-wife’s name on her ballot earned the former head of the Colorado Republican Party four years on probation.

“The mechanisms to safeguard the integrity of the vote are in place in every jurisdiction in the country,” said Chatham, the former Texas prosecutor. “Anybody who says differently hasn’t done the research that I have. They haven’t done the research at all and they just want to believe in conspiracy theories.”

USA TODAY Network reporters Zac Anderson, Joey Garrison, Jimmie Gates, Frank Gluck, Eric Litke, Brian Lyman, Will Peebles and Katie Sobko contributed to this report

EDITOR’S NOTE: This story is part of an ongoing investigation by Columbia Journalism Investigations, the PBS series FRONTLINE and USA TODAY NETWORK reporters that examines allegations of voter disenfranchisement and how the pandemic could impact turnout. It includes the film Whose Vote Counts, premiering on PBS and online Oct. 20 at 10 p.m. EST/9 p.m. CST.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Trump’s absentee ballot fraud claims not supported by evidence

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