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Here’s how technology has evolved over the past two decades

Mish Boyka

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Here's how technology has evolved over the past two decades

 

<p> The humble fungus turned out to be quite a sage and agreed to share a few pieces of invaluable advice with the <em>Homo sapiens</em> species.</p><p>
In the summer, I went camping with my friends. On the first day after our arrival, I woke up early to take a walk and pick some chanterelles for breakfast. As bad luck would have it, however, I left my glasses in the tent, and without them, I struggle to tell mushrooms apart. Still, I resolved to carry on, and having collected a handful of becapped specimens I returned to our camp.
</p><p>
My friends, still fast asleep, did not take me up on my breakfast offer, so I ate my tofu and mushroom scramble alone. And seeing the effect it had on me, I quickly realized I had accidentally collected some mushrooms from the <em>Psilocybe</em> genus. This little mishap was a surprise, but I didn’t let it throw me off balance – I let the psilocybinous song carry me away. And now, I shall report on the places I visited and the things I saw. If I find the right words, that is.</p><p>The ground began to rumble, or maybe rather stir and writhe, as if there was a gargantuan snakelike creature breathing underneath its surface. A low murmur and chemiluminescent glow seeped from between patches of moss and foliage. Greenish tentacles glimmered in the murky ground, twisting and turning, and showed me the way towards the heart of the forest. I recognized those viridescent threads to be mycelium, made of the hyphae that are the basis of fungi’s organization system, whereas the glow seemed to be caused by luciferins – a protein capable of emitting light as the result of an enzymatic reaction. Once this mycological phenomenon dawned on me, I was no longer anxious and walked ahead.</p><p>As I was forcing my way through the thicket, in my mind I tried to systematize all the information about fungi I have learned. They are a kingdom that belongs to the group of eukaryotes, which encompasses all cellular organisms that pack their genetic material into chromosomes kept in their cells’ nuclei. This makes them quite similar to humans, which convinced me even more that I could trust the call that beckoned me forward, especially since those organisms boast ancient evolutionary history. The oldest fossils that have been identified as remnants of fungi are estimated to be around one billion years old, which indisputably proves the primaeval nature of the wisdom that summoned me.</p><p>With every step that brought me closer to the heart of the land, I could hear the commotion of heated dispute grow louder around me. Then I remembered a certain theory linking the consumption of hallucinogenic mushrooms by the ancestors of contemporary humans with the development of our consciousness. If not for the phenomenon of synaesthesia, the meaning of the conversations I heard would surely have been lost on me. After all, fungal communication happens noiselessly, with the aid of chemical substances that flow through the mycelium. Luckily, I could feel the vibrations of the ground and electromagnetic impulses, catching even the tiniest of signal molecules so that I understood everything that was being said.</p>

<p>I finally arrived at an arena shaped like an ascocarp, the fruiting body of the sac fungi. In the stalls sat tens of thousands of various species of fungi, with the elders occupying the seats at the top of the assembly hall, chaired by the Hatter who looked strikingly similar to the well-known and liked Jersey cow mushroom.</p><p>Silencing the crowd, he announced:</p><p>”Welcome, human, son of mycelium.”</p><p>”Greetings to you, my brothers,” I answered kindly, filled with a feeling of unity with all the organisms that surrounded me.</p><p>”Your current state is no accident. You have been chosen from all the <em>Homo sapiens</em> to help us solve the most pressing problems of the modern world. Are you ready to serve our cause?”</p><p>”If you’re talking about the same problems that gnaw at my mind every day, I will be happy to help,” I said to him, but felt that I had addressed each and every fungus individually, as they were an inseparable entity.</p><p>”We know your thoughts, but it might be more anthropomorphic-friendly to allow you to express your worries about the state of the world verbally. As a kingdom of sage species, we have decided to try and save our shared motherland. The only one we all have.”</p><p>”It would be very helpful if I did a quick recap of what we know about you. Please, don’t get me wrong. In my current state, nothing is certain, and such a historic exchange deserves to be fully comprehended by both sides.”</p><p>”We know what you mean. And we would very much like to know what you, humans, think of us exactly.”</p><p>”As far as I’m aware, you were classified as plants for a long time. Your ability to move is far from impressive, and you seem to be well-rooted in the soil. Even mycelium is deceptively similar to plant roots. What is it that makes you different from other kingdoms of the living world?”</p><p>”Actually, some of us can move at a rather speedy pace, and several characteristics differentiate us from plants. First, we have no tissue. Our bodies are made entirely of thickly weaved mycelium. Also, we are heterotrophs, meaning that we absorb nutrition from other organisms, namely decomposing organic matter. Of course, we help it decompose through releasing our digestive enzymes into the environment. This ability makes us the main cleaners of the natural world. We can also feed parasitically, hunt, and cooperate with autotrophic organisms.”</p><p>”But you are not only what you eat?”</p><p>”We are also different from other organisms on a biochemical level. We have our cell walls just like plants do, and they serve the same purpose – to protect the inside of the cell. Interestingly, however, the main ingredient of our walls is not cellulose, as it happens for plants, but chitin, a polysaccharide also found in the exoskeletons of various insects. It’s easy to tell us apart from animals because we use ergosterol instead of cholesterol to build our cellular membrane. But actually, on a genetic level, we are more closely related to animals than we are to plants.”</p><p>”And I imagine this genetic similarity must be the reason for the brotherly feeling that overwhelms me so. I have heard some rumours about the largest organism on our planet. They say it’s a fungus that weighs 440 tonnes! I must say, I find it quite hard to comprehend. If that were true, its cap would be visible from space.”</p><p>”You are taking it a little too far. Cap-and-stem fungi are called mushrooms. They are the fruiting bodies of a fungus. Its essence that is mycelium remains hidden underground and only grows above it to reproduce. It is the mycelium of our stumpy brother that you believe to be the largest living organism. Unfortunately, he could not make it to our meeting. He is a little listless due to his impressive age and bulk. Nobody can remember it very well, but he claims to be more than 2500 years old.”</p><p>”Please, do send him my regards. There is another question I must ask you, though. I have heard a lot about some pioneer species, capable of preparing a low-grade environment for being populated with more demanding species, including herbaceous plants. That makes it just one step away from a fully-developed ecosystem.”</p><p>”Thanks to the wide range of enzymes we produce, we can decompose next to everything! We are not intimidated by rocky areas and conflagration sites. Mycelium and spores can be found even by receding glaciers and in the desert. By processing unwelcoming environments, we create a layer of fertile ground on which life can thrive. It was thanks to us that the first plants could populate dry land. But enough about us. Now it’s time to discuss the problems you have caused for the Earth, and which we can solve. Ask ahead.”</p><p>”You have been around for a long time, so you must be familiar with the history of fossil fuels. We use them as our energy source. We do it by burning them, and while doing so, we release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Recently, this has become a burdensome issue for our civilization. What should we do?”</p><p>”Forests sponge up more than one-third of all CO2 emitted by the plunderous consumption culture of the current era, aptly named the Anthropocene. Plants absorb CO2 and transform it into biomass in the process of photosynthesis. And while we fungi do not photosynthesize, our role in the accumulation of CO2 could hardly be overstated. By establishing symbiotic relationships with plants, we increase the speed of their growth and improve their quality of life. When your scientists compare the efficiency of CO2 ‘cleaning’ in a forest with a low level of mycorrhiza – that is the coexistence of plants and fungi – and a forest with a high level of such interaction, it becomes clear that fungi-rich ecosystems manage this task much better. We must, however, bring another issue to your attention. CO2 is not the only by-product of your activity. Pollution caused by nitrogen compounds is also very impactful, and we aren’t very fond of them. Take care of us, and we will take care of you.”</p><p>”I shall do whatever I can to convince my people. And speaking of fossil fuels, another issue comes to mind. When we extract and transport petroleum, we sometimes cause spills that pollute the environment. Do you have any advice in this department?”</p><p>”It is but a simple matter. We have several families in our ranks who can digest the hydrocarbons that make up this black gore. Other living organisms can use the products of its decomposition. Not only do we purify contaminated soil, but we can also cooperate with plants that grow there, and help them survive. In the right conditions, petroleum waste could become incubators of earth.”</p><p>”It seems that some of our most pressing ecological issues could be tackled with fungal power. But we also have other problems at hand. Human life is becoming longer than ever, and as we age, our health begins to deteriorate. We suffer from all sorts of ailments, from cancers to metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Could fungi heal us?”</p><p>”Oh, dear human, you surely know that many medicines are produced with the use of fungi. Baker’s yeast, which you have been using for years to make bread, wine and beer, is also used in micro-factories.”</p><p>”That is true. We discovered the genome <em>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</em>, which allowed us to understand many biological processes. The similarities between human and fungal cells are staggering. This species of yeast is a model organism, commonly used in scientific research. We can even use yeast to produce insulin, a hormone that is indispensable in treating diabetes, one of our civilization’s diseases.”</p><p>”I am proud of you humans. But remember that you have brought upon yourselves so many of those problems that you are so proud of fixing.”</p><p>”You’re right, and many of them remain unsolved.”</p><p>”I won’t tell you not to worry, but do not abandon hope. We fungi are very fond of Russian literature. One of us, the chaga mushroom that grows on birches, is the protagonist of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s novel<em> Cancer Ward</em>. An infusion made of this arboreal growth has incredibly potent healing abilities: it regulates blood pressure, relieves stomach ulcers, and it can even stop the development of some neoplastic cells. It is also used to treat HIV-positive patients.”</p><p>”I have read this book, and I’d hardly consider the chaga its main character.”</p><p>”Do you want our help or not?”</p><p>”I’m sorry.”</p><p>”It doesn’t matter. Our time is almost up. I can feel the serotonin receptors in your body are almost depleted. In a few moments from now, we will no longer be able to communicate. But do take these leaflets with you, they contain some useful information and interesting facts. Whether you choose to use them and save our shared home or not, is your decision. Goodbye, human, and remember: we are always with you, inside you, and around you. Farewell!”</p><p>*</p>

<p>When I came to, I was lying in a beautiful forest clearing, a handful of leaflets in my fist. The mycelium’s hyphae, which seemed to have coiled around my body, were now receding back into the depths of the fungal world. The clearing looked like an endlessly pulsating mandala, in which the fate of our planet was written. It is up to us whether and how we read them. Fungi are a vast, diverse kingdom, and scientists will need many more years to explore them. They have the potential to solve a number of issues that haunt our civilization. Will we accept the helping stem that they are offering?</p><p>For a few more minutes, I daydreamed. I pondered the challenges that loom over humanity. The thoughtless destruction of our environment. Of the natural magic that seems to be the key to the door of perception and survival. Then I heard the voices of my friends and of the fungi that live within them calling me. They didn’t want to believe my story, but I very much hope that at least some of the fungal wisdom can seep through and into the thallus of <em>Homo sapiens</em>. After all, they gave me leaflets!</p><h3><em>LEAFLETS</em></h3><h3>Decontamination of flat surfaces</h3><p>Another nuclear reactor failure? Are the usual cleaning methods not good enough? Is your kitchen covered in radioactive ash? Or perhaps only cockroaches have survived, and you don’t know whom you should call for help? Try the slimy spike-cap!</p><p>This inconspicuous clammy mushroom is capable of absorbing huge amounts of the radioactive isotope caesium-137, thus immobilizing it. The mushrooms can then be picked and burned in a controlled environment, creating radioactive ash, which enables a much easier way of storing or further processing. The concentration of caesium-137 in the slimy spike-cap can be up to 10,000 times higher than in the environment around it. So put on your hazmat suit and go sporulate some mushrooms.</p><h3>Psylololo</h3><p>Psst! Looking for some mystical experiences? Fancy feeling at one with nature and the shamans that surround you? Or maybe you’re after vivid, colourful hallucinations? Come and join the <em>Psilocybe</em> circle, where colours have flavours, and all existential dread fades away!</p><p>Psilocybin, produced by our clever little brothers, has been known to humanity since the dawn of time. It is suspected to have contributed to the development of human consciousness and to have helped shape our spirituality, leading to the creation of religion. Today, it is used mostly for recreational purposes and in <a href=”https://przekroj.pl/en/society/leaving-your-ego-behind-tomasz-stawiszynski” target=”_blank”>therapy.</a> They say that once the door of perception is open and we see things as they really are, everything else will fall into place. We don’t promise that we can save the world, but it’s worth giving us a chance. Under specialist supervision, of course!</p>

<h3>Mushroom meat</h3><p>Are animal-borne diseases giving your civilization grief again? Has factory farming finally been recognized as animal violence? Perhaps you disagree with the concept of using animals as a source of protein in your diet, but you cannot imagine life without a tasty burger? The answer is already here: Quorn, the meat substitute made of <em>Fusarium venenatum</em>!</p><p>This spelling nightmare is, in fact, a delicious mushroom that grows in a sterile bioreactor, where it needs glucose and nitrogen to grow, and is later enriched with vitamins and mineral compounds. The final product is rich in proteins and fibre, has very little saturated fats, and has an exceptionally low track record of allergic reactions. On top of it, Quorn’s carbon footprint is 80% lower than beef’s. So far, the mushroom is known mainly in the West, but its popularity is growing fast – we can expect to see it on our plates sooner rather than later.</p><h3>Will work for food</h3><p>Reliable and hardworking fungus is looking for employment as polyethene waste utilizer. The issue of excessive amounts of plastic waste in the environment is prevalent, and humans are still looking for new ways to utilize them. My brother <em>Aspergillus terreus</em><em> </em>and I, <em>A. sydowii</em>, will happily take it upon ourselves to solve this pressing issue. Can work under challenging conditions with no special equipment required – we produce all of our enzymatic instruments ourselves, and they are perfect for softening and decomposing polymers. We would also like to use this opportunity to recommend the services of our good friend the oyster mushroom, who specializes in the production of environmentally-friendly biodegradable materials that could soon replace the outdated plastics. Feel free to get in touch.</p><h3>Yeast looking for eukaryote</h3><p>I am one of the best-known organisms on the planet, so how come we haven’t met yet? Tired of sexless germination, I am looking for the possibility of genetic recalibration to enrich my genome and establish a stable romantic relationship.</p><p>My full name is <em>Saccharomyces cerevisiae</em>, although I prefer to be called yeast. My career in the baking industry took off back in the times of the pharaohs. I’m still in touch with my friends and acquaintances in that part of the world, so if we get to know each other better, we can go for an exotic trip with a local guide. The baking business turned out to be very lucrative, but I didn’t see it as much of a challenge, which pushed me to keep expanding my horizons. Maintaining my signature freshly-baked bread scent, I tried my hand at alcohol fermentation. But don’t think me some shady moonshiner! I am a master of biochemical transformations, which I can prove with my vast portfolio of carbohydrates that I change into energy and ethanol. I’m comfortable with oxygen, but oxygen-free environments are also perfectly fine.</p><p>Being a fungus of success, I could never sit back for too long. I decided to try my hand at science next. I was hired as a model organism – not that I had to try very hard, considering my impressive skill set. A single-cell organism capable of growing in all kinds of conditions, a master of mitosis, who easily adapts to molecular modifications, has a lot in common – genetically at least – with more complex eukaryotes, including humans. In short, I am your perfect candidate. My academic interests include synthesizing medicines and hormones, ageing research, unveiling the secrets of cellular divisions and their accompanying DNA repairs, and intensification of mitochondrial mysteries. Lately I have become an avid fan of astrobiology, having visited the circumterrestrial orbit, and am planning a flight to the heliocentric orbit next. And while my genetic information isn’t exactly a scientific enigma, I still have a delicious secret or two to share. If you think you might be interested, swipe right. We’ll have a pastry, brew some wine, and if there’s a spark, we can try some conjugation.</p><p><em>Translated from <a href=”https://przekroj.pl/nauka/mysli-maslaka-tomasz-sitarz” target=”_blank” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>the Polish</a> by Aga Zano</em></p><p>Reprinted with permission of <a target=”_blank” href=”https://przekroj.pl/en/” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>Przekrój</a>. Read the <a href=”https://przekroj.pl/en/science/the-magic-of-mushrooms-tomasz-sitarz” target=”_blank”>original article.</a></p>

Entertainment

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

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CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites that permits clients to download an enormous assortment of kid’s shows for nothing. CartoonExtra online entryway is liable for streaming the most recent English HD kid’s shows.

Additionally, CartoonExtra unlawful site gives Cartoons Download, Anime Download, download joins with captions. Locate your number one kid’s shows and different sorts of CartoonExtra Collection recordings here.

Basic Information About CartoonExtra

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

CartoonExtra is a theft site giving its crowds an immense assortment of kid’s shows in various dialects online free of charge. The broad rundown of the most recent and old drawing of this unlawful site empowered the clients to watch and stream kid’s shows without any problem.

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

CartoonExtra unlawful site gives the HD and high caliber of recently dispatched kid’s shows to their clients as fast as conceivable with print characteristics going from 360P to 720P. CartoonExtra has unlawfully spilled motion pictures of a few language kid’s shows films and it is among the primary destinations.

Some acclaimed kid’s shows are Peppa Pig, PowerPuff Girls, Denice the Menace, Tom and Jerry, The Simpsons, Fairy Gone, Haikyuu, K, Gintama, and more kid’s shows have likewise been spilled by this illicit site.

Working Process of CartoonExtra

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

CartoonExtra is a downpour site, which transfers the entirety of its kid’s shows. Various individuals from unidentified spots direct site administration. Clients may browse film gatherings and import their #1 motion pictures as effectively as they need.

To stream kid’s shows from the CartoonExtra site, the client will initially get to the web by entering the particular space name. What’s more, after this, the client is allowed to download their number one films.

At the point when the site gets to click on promotions and different connections, sponsors furnish distributors with a way to bring in cash from their online substance.

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

The unlawful online site as of late released a film. This may be stun to the entertainment world as the film has fallen prey to robbery.

Cartoons Leaked by CartoonExtra website

CartoonExtra 2021 is one of the most visited illegal websites

CartoonExtra has as of late released a few English kid’s shows on its site. Referencing all the kid’s shows spilled via CartoonExtra is incomprehensible, we will discuss the most well-known kid’s shows spilled by the site. Examine the most recent kid’s shows and anime unlawfully spilled via CartoonExtra.

Disclaimer:

GetFreshNews.com doesn’t promote piracy and is strictly against online piracy. We understand and fully comply with the copyright acts/clauses and ensure we take all steps to comply with the Act.

Through our pages, We intend to inform our users about piracy and strongly encourage our users to avoid such platforms/websites. As a firm, we strongly support copyright acts. We advise our users to be very vigilant and avoid visiting such websites

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Fashion

Can the ‘Sex and the City’ Reboot Keep Up with Fashion’s Woke Evolution?

Emily walpole

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Can the ‘Sex and the City’ Reboot Keep Up with Fashion’s Woke Evolution?

 

It’s been nearly 20 years since Carrie Bradshaw, the protagonist and narrator of the HBO series “Sex and the City,” (SATC) described her penchant for wearing “ghetto gold” to her three equally white girlfriends at brunch as “fun”—not the aesthetic that she envisioned for her engagement ring.

“How can I marry a guy who doesn’t know which ring is me?” she bemoaned after finding a pear-shaped sparkler affixed to a yellow gold band, tucked away in her boyfriend’s belongings.

Though it was a cringe-worthy moment in 2001—and one of many from the show that routinely used gay men as campy comedic props and fetishized Black men, to its overall lack of diversity despite famously being set in New York City, which the show’s actresses often described as the “fifth character”—it didn’t deter millions of rabid fans from tuning into the show the following week to watch Carrie, Samantha, Miranda and Charlotte on their quest for love, success and Manolos in the Big Apple.

More than 10 million viewers watched the show’s final episode three years later, and the subsequent films, 2008’s “Sex and the City” and “Sex and the City 2” in 2010, went on to rake in a total of more than $713 million.

Audiences in 2021, however, may not be as generous—or uneducated. When the show’s star Sarah Jessica Parker announced on her Instagram account earlier this month that a new chapter in the SATC saga called “And Just Like That…” is going into production this spring, the news was met with cautious optimism.

On one hand, the show, which will follow three of the four original characters—Carrie, Miranda and Charlotte—“as they navigate the journey from the complicated reality of life and friendship in their 30s to the even more complicated reality of life and friendship in their 50s,” may be the kind of nostalgic romp that homebound viewers devour. A respite, perhaps, for restless viewers who are in fact navigating their own complicated realities of life and friendship in a pandemic.

On the other hand, the world is in an entirely different state of mind, especially in regard to one of the show’s biggest legacies: fashion.

The Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement in 2020 was the catalyst for an overdue reckoning in the fashion industry, and brought to light the ugly experiences rooted in racism many Black people have encountered while trying to survive in the business. In turn, the movement drove many fashion brands to recalibrate how they address diversity within their companies, promote inclusivity in their campaigns and communicate their messages with sensitivity. BLM also sparked online conversations about intersectional environmentalism and cultural appropriation, educating consumers about the deeper impact of their purchases.

SATC’s cultural exploitation problem didn’t start or stop with “ghetto gold.”

It was on full display in the second film, which took the four friends to Abu Dhabi, the UAE’s conservative capital, in an effort to escape their hectic—or in the case of Carrie, increasingly humdrum—New York City lives. The plot line teed up an endless parade of unfortunate opportunities to flash nonsensical wealth and more tone-deaf fashion choices like headdresses and harem pants, not to mention Carrie’s bewilderment when she finds out that shoes sold at a souk cost just $20. Shocking.

The Sex and the City reboot tees up an unique chance for TV to influence fashion in a positive new direction.

Sex and the City 2

Years later in an interview at a New York Magazine event, Parker said, “I can see where we fell short on that movie, and I’m perfectly happy to say that publicly.” These issues, however, will need to be rectified for the new show to stand a chance because woke fans and influential industry watchdogs, like Diet Prada and Saint Hoax, will be watching, and maybe even salivating and the chance to catch and call out the next big blunder.

“Many of the people I’ve talked to have said ‘I’ll watch it, but…,’” Benjamin Ayer, lead consultant for Benjamin Bellwether, said of the mixed reception to news of the reboot.

“The short of it is that the movies, especially the second one, really marked a point of seemingly no return,” the trend forecaster said. “The second movie has some real pain points for people who saw it as reductive to feminism and diversity; and, that’s on top of complaints that the show, in general, was too white and too materialistic.”

With doubts like these, the reboot runs the risk of becoming another successful “hate-watch” anomaly of the pandemic entertainment landscape, like the Netflix series “Emily in Paris,” which viewers binged last fall only to trade online gripes about the show’s unrealistic portrayal of fashion on an entry-level PR salary. (Though it didn’t stop style-hungry watchers from emulating some of the show’s key style moments, like red berets.) The show, it bears noting, was styled by Patricia Field, the iconic New York City stylist who coined the signature looks of SATC’s characters.

“With conversations around inclusivity growing louder, there will be pressure on the SATC reboot to be diverse and woke,” said Kayla Marci, an analyst for retail market intelligence platform Edited. “However, efforts need to be collaborative, well-researched and authentic to avoid coming off as insincere and tokenistic. As some episodes and parts of the movies were problematic, there is an opportunity to learn from these past mistakes.”

Positive influence

That’s not to say that “And Just Like That…” is doomed before its first fitting.

Rather, experts say the show’s creators and costume department have a chance to sway fashion in a new positive direction. SATC, after all, debuted 12 years before the first ’gram was ever posted. It influenced fashion through the original small screen, television, requiring viewers to come back each week at the same time, Sunday at 9 p.m. EST, for 94 episodes over the course of six years—an ask that seems unreasonable in the instant-gratification age of streaming.

Integral to this change, according to Caroline Vazzana, stylist, influencer and author of Making It in Manhattan: The Beginner’s Guide to Surviving & Thriving in the World of Fashion, will be more diversity behind-the-scenes—from the writing room to the wardrobe truck. More diverse view points on the set will help ensure that the show puts its best foot forward, she said.

The reboot also presents an opportunity to tap into a more mature millennial mindset and, perhaps, reinvigorate how viewers look at their own closets after months of wearing sweats. It may even inspire new loungewear or face-mask trends, Vazzana noted, if the show is set during coronavirus times.

Ayer lauds SATC for how it wielded fashion as a means to express the characters’ personalities and emotions. Field’s ability to build characters through silhouette, color, pattern and accessory choices—many of which went on to become global trends like Carrie’s tulle skirt from the opening credits, the horseshoe necklace she wore throughout season four or her silk corsages in season three—gave consumers the green light to be playfully experimental with their own look.

Manolos and a vintage fur—two Carrie Bradshaw signatures

“I’ve talked to so many women and gay men alike who felt they could be [bolder] in their fashion statements, especially in New York City,” because of the show, Ayer said.

Whether it was pairing two different colors of the same shoe style, like Carrie did when the ladies ventured to Los Angeles in season 3, or making strong shoulders sexy again à la Samantha, Field showed viewers how to mix and match and take risks. This adventurous approach to fashion filtered into street style, which became just as important as runway styling, Ayer added, and made designers who were once only on the tips of the tongues of in-the-know fashionistas, new household names.

Brands such as Manolo Blahnik, Fendi, Dior, Vivienne Westwood and Tiffany are just some of the labels still synonymous with the franchise, Marci said, as well as specific products like Fendi’s baguette bags and Manolo Blahnik’s Hangisi pump, which Big—a character that was likened to Donald Trump in a positive way early on in the series—used in lieu of an engagement ring to propose to Carrie in the first film. (Editor’s note: shoes, apparently, are a more acceptable symbol of love than “ghetto gold” jewelry.)

Woke fans and fashion industry watchdogs will be watching to see if the Sex and the City reboot can address diversity in an authentic way.

A Bergdorf Goodman window display featuring items from “Sex and the City: The Movie”

Since the show ended, Marci said many fashion houses have been reshaped by new creative directors at the helm of Dior, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Burberry, Givenchy and Bottega Veneta. “These legacy brands’ redefined looks are very much in line with Carrie’s feminine and eccentric aesthetic, Miranda’s clean and minimal, and Charlotte’s polished and preppy one,” she said.

The next show, however, has an opportunity to elevate lesser known designers and brands into the spotlight. In addition to the big names that everyone is expecting to see, Marci noted that cult darlings coveted by today’s consumer, like Ganni, Marine Serre or The Vampire’s Wife, would be a welcome addition.

“I’d love to see airtime given to designers spearheading environmental change like Gabriela Hearst and Stella McCartney, or labels that champion inclusivity like Fenty, Prabal Gurung or Christian Siriano, as well as see SATC use its enormous and powerful platform to showcase emerging BIPOC designers,” she said.

Ayer shared that sentiment, adding that the show’s stylists should “reward” high-fashion brands who are embracing diversity on their runways and look books, like Erdem, Balmain, Carolina Herrera, Collina Strada and Ferragamo, with placement on the show.

“The show has the power to elevate designers, and [it] should take that power seriously,” Ayer said. “It would be great to see the same fashion independence that Field brought to the cast of SATC to represent the new fashion industry. The one where sustainability matters, ethics matter, behavior matters.”

His top picks for the characters include “modern” and “powerful” looks by Fear of God for Miranda, classic and modern pieces by Wales Bonner and Andrew Gn for Charlotte and No Sesso and Threeasfour for Carrie’s fearless style. As the shows main trendsetter, Carrie, he added, should be “mixing her vintage fashion with new pieces from local, Black-owned, queer-owned, minority-owned and future-minded brands.”

Brooklyn-based and vice president-approved designer Christopher John Rogers is high on Vazzana’s list of designers whose work should make a cameo. “Christopher John Rogers would be epic and so beautiful for Carrie to be wearing around New York City,” she said.

Christopher John Rogers RTW Spring 2021

The reboot could bring good fortune to local talent. With the show celebrating the city, Marci said it would be great to see New York talent spotlighted. Fendi baguette bags could be traded for a ‘Bushwick Birkin,’ the nickname of Telfar’s in-demand unisex tote, or Carrie could swap her infamous Dior newspaper-print dress for Duckie Confetti’s money robe, she suggested.

A reflection of the times

Another common inducer of eye rolls about SATC was its unrealistic portrayal of wealth. The same lavish fashion that lured people to their TV sets each week also alienated some—particularly New Yorkers who knew the improbability of a local newspaper sex columnist being able to afford Carrie’s Upper East Side abode, endless closet and buzzing social life.

“This fantastical approach to luxury is what made the fashion in the show so iconic because it was very aspirational, yet unbelievable, that these ‘everyday women’ could afford to be head-to-toe in high-end designers every day,” Marci said. Following an economic crisis like the one brought on by the global pandemic, it will be important to balance the fantasy element with reality, she added.

While longtime fans of the show will expect to see a high caliber of designers, SATC must offer a measure of relatability in order to resonate with a new audience, Marci said. “A great way to show luxury in 2021 is to blend designer pieces with more contemporary and affordable brands,” she said. “Given the status of some of the items worn in the show and with sustainability becoming such an urgent and complex issue for the fashion industry, I’d love to see classic outfits re-worn or vintage archival pieces curated.”

The writers bringing the show to life “will have to make sure they reflect the times, and capture the essence of what they started out as: a show that helped normalize the timely female dynamic in mainstream culture,” Ayer added.

But that’s not to say that the ladies can’t catch up on their relationship follies while shopping in The RealReal or in small boutiques that champion diverse designers. Or why not have the characters share pieces, he added, highlighting the ever-growing sharing and rental economy.

“The show is known for the fashion, so represent the times,” Ayer said.

But be authentic

SATC is not the first show from the late ’90s and early aughts to make a recent comeback, but whereas series like “Will & Grace” and “90210” struggled to recreate the magic of their originals, “And Just Like That…” already has social media doing some of the leg work.

It also has Gen Z’s fondness for throwback fashion on its side. “A combination of social media and the revival of ’90s and ’00s fashion has helped keep SATC relevant as well as gain a cult following with a younger generation obsessed with nostalgia for an era they haven’t experienced,” Marci said.

Vazzana pointed out that SATC-themed content performs exceptionally well on TikTok. “Gen Z definitely knows about ‘Sex in the City’… young women and men are still very into that ‘moving to New York City’ mindset,” she said. Do they love the characters and appreciate their style the way older cohorts do? Vazzana isn’t sure. “Gen Z style is very different, but it is not super-eclectic and over-the-top like Carrie is known for,” she said. “Maybe it will  inspire a whole new generation to dress outside the lines.”

But if everyone wanted to “be a Carrie” back in 2004—fans even snapped up “I’m a Carrie” merchandise prior to the show’s finale—Type A Miranda has emerged as the fan-favorite today. “Reopening the SATC series time capsule in the 2020s has led to an internet consensus that Miranda is the coveted character, with attributes and style resonating with young women today,” Marci said, adding that her character is defined as career-driven, proud feminist with a minimal wardrobe.

Additionally, Charlotte, the most traditional character on the show, has become the poster character for political correctness, inspiring the #WokeCharlotte meme, a viral sensation that paired images of prim and proper Charlotte with progressive captions.  The evolution of these characters into today’s world will add to the show’s longevity and its impact on the Gen Z audience, Marci said.

While Ayer said the SATC reboot is really for “millennials and above who loved it the first time around,” as consumers, we are all moved by nostalgic pop-culture phenoms, no matter how we may think we’ve evolved, he added.

“Consumers will always be influenced by entertainment,” Ayer said. “As much as we may fight against it, we are creatures that crave persuasion.”

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Movies playing in Southeast Michigan, new releases Jan. 29 | Arts & Entertainment

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Movies playing in Southeast Michigan, new releases Jan. 29 | Arts & Entertainment

 

Theaters are open at limited capacity and without concession refreshments. The following list includes movies available at local theaters, and movies that are available to watch through online streaming services including: Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Google Play, Hulu, Vudu, FandangoNow, Apple TV+, YouTube, Disney+, HBO Max and more.

Showing at theaters

• “Supernova” (R): A gay couple are traveling on a road trip, as dementia sets in on one of them. Starring Colin Firth and Stanley Tucci. In theaters, Jan. 29. Available streaming, Feb 16.

• “The Little Things” (R): A search for a serial killer in Los Angeles dredges up the past for a deputy sheriff working on the case. Starring Denzel Washington, Rami Malek, Jared Leto and Natalie Morales. In theaters and on HBO Max, Jan. 29.

• “Our Friend” (R): Based on the true story of the Teague family and how their lives are upended by the mom’s diagnosis of terminal cancer. Starring Casey Affleck, Dakota Johnson and Jason Segel.

• “The Human Factor” (PG-13): A behind-the-scenes story from the last 25 years, of how the United States came within reach of pulling off the impossible – securing peace between Israel and its neighbors. Featured negotiators include Dennis Ross, Martin Indyk, Gamal Helal and Aaron David Miller.

• “One Night in Miami” (R): Four icons of sports, music, and activism – Cassius Clay, (aka Muhammad Ali), Malcolm X, Sam Cooke and Jim Brown – gathered one night in 1964 to celebrate one of the biggest upsets in boxing history, and discuss the responsibility of being successful black men during the civil rights movement. Starring Eli Goree, Kingsley Ben-Adir, Leslie Odom Jr. and Aldis Hodge.

• “The Marksman” (PG-13): A former Marine lives a solitary life as a rancher along the Arizona-Mexican border, until he tries to protect a boy on the run from members of a vicious cartel. Starring Liam Neeson, Katheryn Winnick, Juan Pablo Raba and Teresa Ruiz.

• “Wrath of Man” (R): A man works for an armored truck company in Los Angeles, moving hundreds of millions of dollars. Starring Jason Statham, Scott Eastwood, Holt McCallany and Josh Hartnett.

• “Monster Hunter” (PG-13): Lt. Artemis and her soldiers are transported to a new world, full of dangerous and powerful monsters. Starring Milla Jovovich, Tony Jaa and Ron Perlman.

• “Pinocchio” (PG-13): Adaption of the classic tale, filmed in Italy. Starring Federico Ielapi, Marine Vacth and Davide Marotta.

• “Wonder Woman 1984” (PG-13): A new chapter in the Wonder Woman story, where Diana Prince lives quietly among mortals in modern world, 1984. Starring Gal Gadot, Kristen Wiig, Chris Pine and Pedro Pascal. In theaters and available on HBO Max.

• “News of the World” (PG-13): After the Civil War, Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd, moves from town to town as a non-fiction storyteller, and crosses paths with Johanna, a 10-year-old taken in by the Kiowa people six years earlier and raised as one of their own. Kidd agrees to return the child to her biological aunt and uncle, where the law says she belongs. Starring Tom Hanks and Helena Zengel.

• “Promising Young Woman” (R): Everyone said Cassie was a promising young woman until a mysterious event derailed her future. Now, an unexpected encounter is about to give Cassie a chance to right the wrongs of the past. Starring Carey Mulligan, Bo Burnham and Laverne Cox.

• “The Croods- A New Age” (PG): The Croods new animated film finds the prehistoric family looking for a new place to live. They find a walled-in paradise that meets their needs. The only problem is another family already lives there: the Bettermans. Starring Nicolas Cage, Catherine Keener, Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. Also streaming on demand.

• “Freaky” (R): Millie Kessler is just trying to survive her senior year of high school when she becomes a victim of The Butcher, the town’s infamous serial killer and his mystical ancient dagger, which causes him and Millie to wake up in each other’s bodies. Millie has just 24 hours to get her body back before the switch becomes permanent. Meanwhile, The Butcher looks like her and takes his appetite for carnage to Homecoming. Starring Vince Vaughn, Kathryn Newton and Celeste O’Connor.

• “Fatale” (R): Derrick (Michael Ealy), is a successful sports agent, until a one night stand turns out to be a police detective (Hilary Swank) who entangles him in her latest investigation. In theaters and available on Premium Video On-Demand, (PVOD).

• “The War with Grandpa” (PG): Comedy about a sixth-grader named Peter (Oakes Fegley) who is forced to give up his bedroom when his recently widowed grandfather Ed (Robert De Niro) moves in. Peter tries to drive out grandpa with elaborate pranks, but grandpa resists. Based on the award-winning book by Robert Kimmel Smith. Also starring Christopher Walken, Uma Thurman, Rob Riggle, Cheech Marin, Laura Marano and Jane Seymour. In theaters and available on Amazon Prime.

Streaming movies

• “The Dig”: Escavators find a wooden ship from the Dark Ages while digging up a burial ground on a woman’s estate. Starring Carey Mulligan, Ralph Fiennes, Lily James and Johnny Flynn. Available on Netflix, Jan. 29.

• “Palmer” (R): Former high-school football star Eddie Palmer (Justin Timberlake) returns home to Louisiana after serving 12 years in a state penitentiary. He moves back in with his grandmother, (June Squibb), who raised him and tries to rebuild a quiet life. Complications arise when the hard-living neighbor Shelly (Juno Temple) disappears leaving her 7-year-old son Sam (Ryder Allen) in Palmer’s reluctant care. Available on Apple TV+, Jan. 29.

• “The White Tiger” (R): Based on the best-selling novel of the same name about a poor villager who climbs to success in modern India. Available on Netflix.

• “The Kid Detective” (R): A down-and-out detective teams up with a teenager to solve the mysterious murder of her boyfriend. Starring Adam Brody and Sophie Nelisse. Available on Amazon Prime.

• “Outside the Wire” (R): Sci-fi film about a drone pilot sent into a war zone to help an android officer stop a nuclear attack. Starring Anthony Mackie, Damson Idris and Emily Beecham. Available on Netflix.

• Pieces of a Woman”: A home birth ends in tragedy for a Boston couple, (Martha and Sean). The story centers on Martha as she learns to live with her grief while working through fractious relationships with Sean and her mother along with the publicly vilified midwife, whom she must face in court. Starring Vanessa Kirby, Ellen Burstyn, Shia LaBeouf and Molly Parker. Available on Netflix.

• “Herself” (R): A young mother escapes her abusive husband and fights back against a broken housing system. Starring Clare Dunne, Harriet Walter and Ericka Roe.

• “Shadow in the Cloud” (R) A female WWII pilot travels with top-secret documents on a B-17 Flying Fortress and encounters an evil presence on board. Starring Chloë Grace Moretz, Nick Robinson and Taylor John Smith.

• “The Midnight Sky” (PG-13): Post-apocalyptic tale follows a lonely scientist in the Arctic, as he races to stop fellow astronauts from returning home to a global catastrophe. Starring George Clooney, Felicity Jones and David Oyelowo. Available on Netflix.

• “Soul” (PG): Pixar Animation Studios’ introduces Joe Gardner (voice of Jamie Foxx) – a middle-school band teacher who gets the chance of a lifetime to play at the best jazz club in town. But one small misstep takes him from the streets of New York City to The Great Before, where souls go before they go to Earth. Also starring voice of Tina Fey. Available on Disney+.

• “Tenet” (PG-13): Action epic from the world of international espionage, directed by Christopher Nolan. It is a co-production between the United Kingdom and United States, filmed on location across seven countries. Starring John David Washington, Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki, Dimple Kapadia and Michael Caine.

• “Greenland” (PG-13): A family makes a perilous journey for survival as a planet-killing comet races towards Earth. Starring Gerard Butler and Morena Baccarin. Available on Premium Video On-Demand, (PVOD).

• “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”: During an afternoon recording session in 1920s Chicago, trailblazing performer Ma Rainey, the “Mother of the Blues,” engages in a battle of wills with her white producer over control of her music. As the band waits, trumpeter Levee (Chadwick Boseman) is determined to stake his own claim on the music industry — and spurs his fellow musicians. Starring Viola Davis, Chadwick Boseman, Glynn Turman. Available on Netflix.

• “The Prom” (PG-13): New York City stage stars try to resurrect their new Broadway show that is a major flop, by supporting a small-town, high school student who has been banned by the PTA from attending the prom with her girlfriend. Starring Meryl Streep, James Corden, Nicole Kidman, Keegan-Michael Key. Available on Netflix.

• “Songbird” (PG-13): Set in Los Angeles, the world is in its fourth year of lockdown after the COVID-23 virus has mutated. A courier, Nico (KJ Apa), who’s immune to the virus, races to save the woman he loves, Sara (Sofia Carson), from a quarantine camp.

• “Sound of Metal” (R): A heavy-rock drummer suddenly loses his hearing, starring Riz Ahmed, Olivia Cooke and Mathieu Amalric. Available on Amazon Prime Video.

• “Wander” (R): Hired to investigate a suspicious death, a private investigator becomes convinced it is linked to the same conspiracy and cover-up that caused his daughter’s death. Starring Aaron Eckhart, Tommy Lee Jones and Heather Graham.

• “What Lies Below”: Science-fiction thriller about a 16-year-old who returns home from camp to learn that her mother has a mysterious fiancé. Starring Ema Horvath, Mena Suvari, Trey Tucker and Troy Iwata.

• “Minor Premise”: Attempting to surpass his father’s legacy, a reclusive neuroscientist becomes entangled in his experiment, pitting 10 fragments of his consciousness against each other. Starring Sathya Sridharan, Paton Ashbrook, Dana Ashbrook, Purva Bedi and Alex Breaux.

• “Hillbilly Elegy” (R): A Yale Law student goes back to his Appalachian hometown. Starring Amy Adams, Glenn Close, Gabriel Basso and Haley Bennett. Available on Netflix.

• “Lego Star Wars Holiday Special”: An animated sequel set after the events of the Star Wars sequel trilogy. Available on Disney+.

• “Iron Mask”: Jackie Chan and Arnold Schwarzenegger star in this misguided adventure.

• “The Nest” (R): An entrepreneur and his family begin to unravel after moving into an old country manor in England in the 1980s. Starring Jude Law, Carrie Coon and Anne Reid.

• “The Forty-Year-Old Version” (R): A struggling New York City playwright reinvents herself as a rapper. Starring Welker White, Reed Birney and Jacob Ming. Available on Netflix.

• “Echo Boomers” (R): Thriller about disillusioned millennials who break into wealthy homes in Chicago. Starring Patrick Schwarzenegger, Alex Pettyfer and Michael Shannon.

• “The Life Ahead” (PG-13): Set in Italy, Sophia Loren plays a Holocaust survivor who forges a friendship with a young immigrant, who recently robbed her. Based on Romain Gary’s 1975 book “The Life Before Us”. Available on Netflix.

• “2 Hearts” (PG-13): A story about two romances: a college student in love with a classmate, and a wealthy Cuban exile in love with a flight attendant. Starring Jacob Elordi, Tiera Skovbye and Adan Canto. Available on Fandango Now.

• “Infidel” (R): A desperate woman tries to save her husband after he’s kidnapped and put on trial for espionage in Iran. Starring Jim Caviezel, Claudia Karvan and Hal Ozsan.

• “On the Rocks” (R): A New York woman and her father try to find out if her husband is having an affair. Starring Bill Murray, Rashida Jones and Marlon Wayans. Available on Apple TV+.

• “The Witches” (PG): Remake of a 1990 movie based on Roald Dahl’s book of the same name about a young orphaned boy who goes to live with his loving grandma in Alabama. The boy and his grandmother encounter deceptively glamorous witches. Starring Anne Hathaway, Octavia Spencer, Stanley Tucci and Chris Rock. Available on HBO Max.

• “Spell” (R): While flying a plane to his father’s funeral in rural Appalachia, an intense storm causes Marquis to lose control of the plane carrying himself and his family. He awakens wounded, alone and trapped in the attic of Ms. Eloise, a Hoodoo practitioner, who claims she can nurse him back to health. Unable to call for help, Marquis tries to break free and save his family from a sinister ritual. Starring Omari Hardwick, Loretta Devine and Andre Jacobs. Available on Fandango Now and Vudu.

• “Borat-Subsequent Movie Film” (R): Kazakh funnyman Borat is released from prison for bringing shame to his country, and then returns to America with his 15-year-old daughter. Starring Sacha Baron Cohen and Maria Bakalova. Available on Amazon Prime Video.

• “Rebecca” (PG-13): Psychological thriller based on Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 gothic novel about a newly married young woman who moves into her new husband ’s family estate, battling the shadow of his first wife, the elegant and urbane Rebecca. Starring Lily James, Armie Hammer and Kristin Scott Thomas. Available on Netflix.

• “The Broken Hearts Gallery” (PG-13): Lucy, a 20-something art gallery assistant living in New York City, saves a souvenir from each past relationship. Starring Dacre Montgomery, Geraldine Viswanathan and Phillipa Soo.

• “The New Mutants” (PG-13): Film based on the Marvel comic series about five young people who demonstrate special powers and are brought to a secret institution to undergo treatments they are told will cure them of the dangers of their powers. Starring Blu Hunt, Maisie Williams, Charlie Heaton, Henry Zaga, Anya Taylor-Joy and Alice Braga.

• “Unhinged” (R): Russell Crowe stars in this psychological thriller that takes road rage to a terrifying conclusion. Rachel (Caren Pistorius) is running late getting to work when she crosses paths with a stranger (Crowe) at a traffic light. Soon, Rachel finds herself and everyone she loves the target of a man who feels invisible and is looking to make one last mark upon the world by teaching her a series of deadly lessons.

• “Cut Throat City” (R): Action heist movie, set in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina devastation. Starring Demetrius Shipp Jr., Shameik Moore, Kat Graham, Eiza González and Wesley Snipes. Available for video rent or to buy.

• “Enola Holmes” (PG-13): Based on the book series by Nancy Springer, the film is set in England, 1884. Enola Holmes (Millie Bobby Brown) wakes on her 16th birthday, to find that her mother (Helena Bonham Carter) has disappeared, leaving behind an odd assortment of gifts. Placed under the care of her brothers Sherlock (Henry Cavill) and Mycroft (Sam Claflin), Enola escapes to search for her mother in London. Available on Netflix.

• “The Devil All the Time” (R): A young man is devoted to protecting his loved ones in a town full of corruption. Starring Tom Holland II, Bill Skarsgård and Riley Keough.

• “Antebellum” (R): Thriller about a successful author who finds herself trapped in a horrifying reality. Starring Janelle Monáe, Eric Lange and Jena Malone.

• Mulan (PG-13): Live action remake of the 1999 animated Disney film of the same name about Hua Mulan, the eldest daughter of an honored warrior, who steps in to take the place of her ailing father, to serve in the Imperial Army. Starring Yifei Liu, Donnie Yen and Jason Scott Lee. Available on Disney+.

• “I’m Thinking of Ending Things” (R): Based on novel by Ian Reid, the film stars Jessie Buckley as a young woman who takes a road trip with her boyfriend (Jesse Plemons) to his family farm. Also starring Toni Collette and David Thewlis. Available on Netflix.

• “Bill and Ted Face the Music” (PG-13): Bill and Ted, now middle aged, set out on a new adventure when a visitor from the future warns them that “only their song can save life as we know it”. They are helped by their daughters and a few music legends. Starring Keanu Reeves, Alex Winter and Samara Weaving.

• “The One and Only Ivan” (PG): Disney animated film based on a Newbery Medal-winning book about a gorilla named Ivan, who tries to piece together his past with the help of an elephant named Stella, starring Angelina Jolie, Sam Rockwell, Danny DeVito and Bryan Cranston. Available on Disney+.

• The Sleepover” (PG): Two siblings learn their mother is a highly trained former thief kidnapped for one last job, and only they can save her. Starring Sadie Stanley, Maxwell Simkins and Ken Marino. Available on Netflix.

• “Project Power” (R): A mysterious new pill on the streets of New Orleans unlocks superpowers unique to each user, but the effects are not known until after taking the pill. Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Dominique Fishback and Jamie Foxx. Available on Netflix.

• “The Burnt Orange Heresy” (R): Art critic, James Figueras (Claes Bang), has fallen from grace, and goes to work in Milan lecturing tourists about art history. He is contacted by wealthy art dealer Joseph Cassidy (Mick Jagger) who asks him to steal a painting from a reclusive artist, Jerome Debney (Donald Sutherland). Also starring Elizabeth Debicki.

• “The Tax Collector” (NR): Two longtime “tax collectors” for a crime lord face difficulties when a rival crime lord returns to the area, set in Los Angeles. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Bobby Soto and George Lopez.

• “I Used to Go Here” (NR): An author becomes involved in the lives of a group of college students after being asked to speak at her alma mater. Starring Gillian Jacobs, Josh Wiggins and Jemaine Clement.

• “The Secret Garden” (PG): Based on the classic novel written by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Set in England, the film follows a young orphan girl who is sent to live with her uncle, where she discovers a magical garden on his estate. Starring Colin Firth, Julie Walters and Dixie Egerickx.

• “The Rental” (R): Two couples take a weekend trip at an oceanside getaway rental house and start to suspect the host may be spying on them. Starring Alison Brie, Dan Stevens, Jeremy Allen White, and Sheila Vand. Horror film, directed by Dave Franco.

• “The Kissing Booth 2” (NR): After a romantic summer with her reformed bad-boy boyfriend Elle Evans (Joey King) heads back to high school for her senior year. Also starring Jacob Elordi, Joel Courtney and Taylor Zakhar Perez. Available on Netflix.

• “The Old Guard” (R): A group of immortal mercenaries, led by a warrior, Andy (Charlize Theron), have fought to protect the mortal world for centuries. When their extraordinary abilities are exposed, it’s up to Andy and Nile (Kiki Layne), the newest soldier to join their ranks, to protect their power. Based on the graphic novel by Greg Rucka. Available on Netflix.

— MediaNews Group

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