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Fashion School Diaries: The SCAD Graduate Using Footwear Design to Talk About Mental Health

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Fashion School Diaries: The SCAD Graduate Using Footwear Design to Talk About Mental Health

Benjamin Spencer

Benjamin Spencer

Fashion

Emmys Red Carpet Fashion: Most Memorable Looks from Anya Taylor-Joy to Billy Porter

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Emmys Red Carpet Fashion: Most Memorable Looks from Anya Taylor-Joy to Billy Porter

After a 2020 awards show where the nominees appeared virtually, the Emmy Awards are back and in person this year. Taking place at L.A.

Live in downtown Los Angeles, the red carpet parade started at 3 p.m. PT with early arrivals including The Crown‘s Josh O’Connor wearing Loewe, Nailed It! host Nicole Byer in a purple Christian Siriano gown, Rita Wilson in Tom Ford and SNL‘s Bowen Yang in silver platform heels.

Read on to see the the best and the worst of the night — from the head-turners to the head-scratchers — of the Emmys red carpet.

Anya Taylor-Joy in Dior

Nominee Anya Taylor-Joy wore a pale yellow gown and yellow opera coat by Dior Haute Couture. Tiffany & Co. diamonds completed the look.

Regé-Jean Page in Giorgio Armani

The Bridgerton nominee wore made-to-measure Giorgio Armani: a midnight blue silk jacquard double-breasted evening jacket with a modified shawl collar, paired with classic evening trousers and a midnight blue evening shirt with a hidden placket. His accessories included a Longines watch, velvet tuxedo slippers by Gianvito Rossi and a sapphire and gold stud earring by Los Angeles-based jewelry designer Cathy Waterman.

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Regé-Jean Page
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Michaela Coel in Christopher John Rogers

Quadruple nominee Michaela Coel wore a bold neon two-piece gown by Christopher John Rogers.

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Michaela Coel
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Kate Winslet in Giorgio Armani

Winner Kate Winslet paired her black silk cady and chiffon gown by Giorgio Armani Privé with vintage jewelry from Fred Leighton.

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Kate Winslet
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Elizabeth Olsen in The Row

Nominee Elizabeth Olsen wore a caftan-like gown designed by her sisters, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, for The Row, plus jewelry by Chopard.

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Elizabeth Olsen
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Hannah Waddingham in Christian Siriano

Emmy winner Hannah Waddingham, with co-star and fellow winner Brett Goldstein, wore a peach silk draped dress by Christian Siriano.

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Hannah Waddingham
Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times via Getty

Mj Rodriguez in Versace

Pose nominee Mj Rodriguez wore a custom teal gown by Atelier Versace with jewelry by Bulgari. “I wanted to look like water coming out of the sea,” the actress said on the red carpet.

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MJ Rodriguez
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Sarah Paulson

Sarah Paulson wore a red ruched gown with a deep V neck by Carolina Herrera with diamond earrings by Mateo.

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Sarah Paulson
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Mindy Kaling

Mindy Kaling wore a black column gown with a custom bow by Carolina Herrera and shoes by Jimmy Choo, plus more than 50 carats of diamonds by De Beers Jewellers.

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Mindy Kaling
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Taraji P. Henson in Elie Saab

Taraji P. Henson wore a plunging gown by Elie Saab, jewelry by Roberto Coin and shoes by Sophia Webster.

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Taraji P. Henson
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Jason Sudeikis in Tom Ford

Ted Lasso winner Jason Sudeikis, ditching his hoodies, wore a velvet tuxedo and boots by Tom Ford.

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Jason Sudeikis
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Billy Porter in Ashi

Pose star Billy Porter wore a winged custom look by Ashi with jewelry by Lorraine Schwartz and H. Crowne. “You know we got the wings. It was supposed to go all the way to the floor. That didn’t work out,” said the actor on the EW / People pre-show.

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Billy Porter

Kaley Cuoco in Vera Wang

Nominee Kaley Cuoco wore a neon-hued gown by Vera Wang Haute with diamonds by De Beers Jewellers.

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Kaley Cuoco
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Issa Rae

Issa Rae wore a gown by Jason Rembert for New York-based Aliétte with graphic earrings by London-based jewelry designer Fernando Jorge.

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Issa Rae
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Kerry Washington in Etro

Kerry Washington wore a custom pale lilac bias-cut silk gown with corset detailing by Etro.

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Kerry Washington
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Mandy Moore

Mandy Moore wore a crimson gown by Carolina Herrera.

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Mandy Moore
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Cynthia Erivo in Louis Vuitton

Nominee Cynthia Erivo wore a custom feather-trimmed leather halter gown by Louis Vuitton with diamonds by Roberto Coin.

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Cynthia Erivo
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Josh O’Connor in Loewe

The Crown star Josh O’Connor, winner for best lead actor in a drama series, wore a custom suit by Loewe with a black-tie element in the shape of a flower. “I’m wearing head to toe Loewe and this is a flower. We’ve had some kind of issues with keeping it up but it’s holding, that’s the story,” he said on the People/Entertainment Weekly red-carpet pre-show.

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Josh O’Connor
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Angela Bassett

Angela Bassett wore a black column gown with pink ruffle detail by Greta Constantine, paired with jewelry by Gismondi 1754.

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Angela Bassett
Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times via Getty

Jurnee Smollett in Dior

Lovecraft Country nominee Jurnee Smollett wore Dior Haute Couture paired with Bulgari jewelry and Christian Louboutin shoes. “Thank you @dior and @mariagraziachiuri for making me feel like a princess in this dreamy dress,” wrote the actress on her Instagram.

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Jurnee Smollett
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Cedric The Entertainer in Jason Rembert

Emmy Awards telecast host Cedric the Entertainer wore a graphic blue suit by stylist and designer Jason Rembert. “I feel good. I feel swaggy. We gonna do a couple other looks tonight. We gonna go hard with it,” the comedian said on the EW / People pre-show.

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Cedric the Entertainer
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Emma Corrin in Miu Miu

In London, The Crown nominee Emma Corrin wore a custom gown with matching gloves and cap by Miu Miu. The star called the look “crucible realness for EMMYS 2021″ on Instagram.

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Emma Corrin
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Jean Smart

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Jean Smart
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Kathryn Hahn in Lanvin

Nominee Kathryn Hahn wore a strapless jumpsuit with belt by Lanvin and an emerald. She also wore a diamond necklace, with diamond and emerald rings, all from New York-based estate jewelry Briony Raymond. “I love wearing a jumpsuit. It feels like me,” said the WandaVision star on the THAT ONE/People pre-show.

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Kathryn Hahn
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Yara Shahidi in Dior

Yara Shahidi wore a custom emerald-hued gown by Dior Haute Couture, jewelry by Cartier and nude leather pumps by Christian Louboutin.

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Yara Shahidi
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Allison Janney in Azzi & Osta

Nominee Allison Janney wore an ivory look by Azzi & Osta, comprised of a structured crepe belted jacket with a peplum and draped neckline that transforms into a shawl with a custom full-length fitted skirt with slit.

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Allison Janney
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Leslie Odom Jr.

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Leslie Odom Jr.
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America Ferrera

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America Ferrera
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Annie Murphy in Valentino

Annie Murphy wore a crepe and chiffon draped shirtdress by Valentino Haute Couture with one-of-a-kind earrings and ring embellished with aquamarines by Los Angeles-based jewelry designer Irene Neuwirth.

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Annie Murphy
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Kerri Russell and Matthew Rhys

Keri Russell, seen on the red carpet with partner Matthew Rhys, wore a rose-hued beaded gown with a front slit and caped train by Zuhair Murad.

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Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys
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Michael Douglas in Canali and Catherine Zeta-Jones in Christina Octavian

Catherine Zeta-Jones wore a gown by New York-based designer Christina Ottaviano, diamonds by Lorraine Schwartz and satin pumps by Christian Louboutin, while nominee Michael Douglas wore a suit by Canali.

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Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones
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Robin Thede in Jason Wu

Double nominee Robin Thede wore a custom gown by Jason Wu Atelier with vintage jewels from Fred Leighton.

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Robin Thede
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Ellen Pompeo in Elie Saab

The actress wore a black velvet long-sleeve jumpsuit with crystal detailing by Elie Saab.

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Ellen Pompeo

Nicole Byer in Christian Siriano

Nailed It! host Nicole Byer, nominated for outstanding host for a reality or reality-competition program, wore a purple ballgown by Christian Siriano. Getting ready, she said on the People/THAT ONE pre-show, “took like a full two hours.”

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Nicole Byer
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Catherine O’Hara

Catherine O’Hara wore a jumpsuit by Cong Tri with jewelry by Anne Sisteron.

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Catherine O’Hara
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Tracee Ellis Ross in Valentino

Nominee Tracee Ellis Ross wore a beaded chiffon dress by Valentino Haute Couture with jewelry by Tiffany & Co. and patent-leather pumps by Christian Louboutin.

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Tracee Ellis Ross
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Rita Wilson in Tom Ford

Rita Wilson, taking part in the opening of the awards show, wore a black silk tuxedo with sequined top by Tom Ford with jewelry by David Yurman.

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Rita Wilson attends the 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards at L.A. LIVE on September 19, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.
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Samira Wiley in Sara Cavazza Facchini for Genny

Nominee Samira Wiley is wearing a tuxedo by Sara Cavazza Facchini for Genny, with jewelry by David Yurman and Lark & Berry and shoes by Sophia Webster.

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Samira Wiley
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Bowen Yang in Ermenegildo Zegna

SNL nominee Bowen Yang wore a tuxedo by Ermenegildo Zegna, jewelry by Tiffany & Co. and silver platform heels by Brooklyn-based Syro, a queer-owned cult footwear brand co-founded by Henry Bae and Shaobo Han.

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Bowen Yang
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Kenan Thompson

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Kenan Thompson
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Dan Levy

Presenter Dan Levy wore three pieces from Valentino Haute Couture’s fall winter 2021 collection: a gabardine jacket in electric blue, a velvet-lurex shirt and wool trousers with gabardine panels.

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Dan Levy
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Uzo Aduba

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Uzo Aduba
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Bo Burnham

Nominee Bo Burnham wore a blue velvet tuxedo by Etro and jewelry by David Yurman.

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Bo Burnham
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Amber Ruffin

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Amber Ruffin
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Carl Clemons-Hopkins

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Carl Clemons-Hopkins
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Gillian Anderson in Chloe

In London, nominee Gillian Anderson wore a midriff-baring look by Chloe.

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Gillian Anderson
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Trevor Noah

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Trevor Noah
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Brendan Hunt

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Brendan Hunt
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Susan Kelechi Watson in Markarian

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Susan Kelechi Watson
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Dave Burd

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Dave Burd
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Cecily Strong

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Cecily Strong
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Ashley Nicole Black

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Ashley Nicole Black
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Beth Behrs in Georges Hobeika

Beth Behrs wore a beaded silk gown by Georges Hobeika with diamond Vine ear cuffs by Graziela.

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Beth Behrs
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D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai

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D’Pharaoh Woon-A-Tai
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Madeline Brewer

Nominee Madeline Brewer wore a bronze lacquered knit tank dress by Tom Ford.

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Madeline Brewer
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Anthony Anderson

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Anthony Anderson
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Sophia Bush in Markarian

Sophia Bush wore a pink silk-faille gown by Alexandra O’Neill for Markarian.

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Sophia Bush
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Ken and Tran Jeong

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Ken Jeong and Tran Jeong
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What does American fashion stand for now?

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What does American fashion stand for now?

There was change afoot at New York Fashion Week, and it wasn’t just in the return to physical shows or in the front rows populated with fresh-faced TikTok stars or in the proof of double vaccination required for entry at every venue.

You could feel it at Collina Strada, held on the rooftop farm of a grubby strip mall in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, where designer Hillary Taymour put forward a vision for joyous, inclusive, climate-conscious fashion by outfitting collaborators, their families and the physically disabled model Emily Barker in a vibrant, layered mish-mash of tie-dye and floral-print skater dresses made of deadstock and recycled fabrics.

You could feel it at the Latino designer Willy Chavarria’s show, who sent out shirtless male models, many of them street-cast, in pleated khaki “cholo” pants as wide and luxurious as ball skirts. And at Vaquera, designed by Patric DiCaprio, Claire Sullivan and Bryn Taubensee, where friends of the label stormed past in ruffled black plastic dresses and sling-back heels fastened with duct tape for a standing-only audience in a fenced-off alley in Chinatown. You could also feel it at the Kanye West-backed label Maisie Wilen, where designer Maisie Schloss dressed models of a variety of shapes in figure-hugging party dresses.

It was American fashion, but not as we’ve known it. These designers are part of an emerging set — one that also includes Telfar Clemens and Pyer Moss’s Kerby-Jean Raymond, and the longer established Christian Siriano and Prabal Gurung — who are redefining American fashion along social and political rather than aesthetic lines. Challenging the industry’s historically narrow definition of beauty, and often imbued with a DIY sensibility, their designs bear little resemblance to the clean-edged, patrician elegance codified by Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein and Michael Kors over the past half century (and which are part of an exhibition on American fashion opening at the Met this week). Nor do these designers harbour ambitions to build global, billion-dollar lifestyle brands as Proenza Schouler, Alexander Wang, Derek Lam and other designers of the post-9/11 generation once did.

Collina Strada dressed collaborators and their families in tie-dye and floral-print skater dresses . . .  © Alessandro Viero / Gorunway.com

. . . made of deadstock and recycled fabrics © Alessandro Viero / Gorunway.com

“They put values above sales,” observes Steven Kolb, chief executive of the CFDA, the US fashion industry’s organising body.

“We’ve seen those designers, like Public School, who were on that track and fizzled out a bit,” says Taymour, who estimates that Collina Strada did between $1.5m and $2m in sales last year and claims to care about revenues only to the extent that she can pay her full-time staff of four. “Once you start to be in that corporate zone and put to these demanding volumes of sales growth, it’s unfathomable. . . I just want Collina to continue, without losing the vision.”

(Though now emerging into the spotlight, not all of these designers are fresh out of fashion school: Chavarria is 54, and a designer at Calvin Klein; Taymour reminds me she has been showing for 13 years, but was only this week inducted into the CFDA.)

Willy Chavarria’s male models wore trousers as wide as ball skirts . . . 

. . . while models at Vaquera donned ruffled black plastic dresses

“The mindset of a young entrepreneur now is not ‘I want to be the next Michael Kors’, they don’t, they want to be a business that makes money where they can create what they want to create,” says Gary Wassner, chief executive of Hilldun, which provides financing and other services to more than 500 retailers and fashion brands. “These young brands are really happy doing $3m, $5m, $10m a year. They’re leaner, they make money, they sell directly to their consumers.”

“Their values are not about classic sportswear, but about inclusivity, diversity,” he continues. “We’re seeing the emergence of a values-led fashion here, which we’re not seeing anywhere else.”

“We’re in an emergence of something, a renaissance, you can feel how it’s changing,” echoes the Uruguayan designer Gabriela Hearst who, in addition to running her namesake label, last year became the creative director of Richemont-owned Chloé in Paris. “The only thing I’m focusing on is co-operation and unity and sustainability because we are in a place that is bigger than our industry, we’re talking about 12 to 18 months to really figure out if we can get ourselves together on climate change.”

More than a third of fabrics used in Gabriela Hearst’s collection were recycled or deadstock . . . © Thomas Concordia

. . . and she has vowed her next pre-fall collection will be fully sustainable © Thomas Concordia

Hearst, an angular blonde who is the best model for her six-year-old brand, has long put sustainability at the centre of her practice and messaging while still growing a solid business — sales amounted to $21m in 2020 and are projected to grow 40 per cent this year, the company said.

This season she partnered with Navajo Nation weavers and women’s collectives in Uruguay and Bolivia on rainbow-hued ponchos and graphic macramé dresses, and woven panels that were patchworked on to narrow dresses. These were shown alongside double-breasted trouser suits and the long, 1970s-style coats that have become the brand’s signatures. Thirty-eight per cent of the fabrics were recycled or deadstock, which was below Hearst’s target; she has pledged to make her next pre-fall collection from 100 per cent deadstock or recycled materials to compensate.

The resulting collection was both beautiful and meaningful, though one wishes she would experiment with new silhouettes.

Khaite’s Cate Holstein is another designer with a head both for design and for business. She managed to grow sales in the high double-digits during the pandemic by focusing on knitwear, versatile dresses and online direct sales.

Khaite’s Cate Holstein focused on a neutral palette . . . 

. . . while Proenza Schouler included vibrant primary colours © Jonas Gustavsson

This season’s collection aimed “to propose a definitive New York wardrobe”, according to the show notes, mixing pared-back staples such as trenchcoats and leather moto jackets with stiff horsehair skirts, and strappy dresses and shirts layered under silk harnesses in a largely neutral palette. Accessorised with supersized satchels and saddle bags, it was graceful, sexy and sellable.

The same could be said for Proenza Schouler. While the previous collections from Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez were about home living, this season’s line-up — shown to great effect on Little Island, the park recently erected on concrete pillars over the Hudson River — was about stepping out again, with smart hourglass tunics and cotton jacquard blazers layered over straight trousers, and easy, polished dresses of fluid crêpe and fringed jersey in primary colours. It was one of the best collections of the week.

Early in the pandemic, many called for a industry-wide “reset” of producing less and travelling less. But while inventory levels are certainly lower, and few international buyers and press were able to travel to New York due to government restrictions, it has become clear that fashion shows, and travelling to them, will soon resume in full.

At Tory Burch, models wore cinched-waist dresses and checked full skirts with deep pockets . . .  © Dan Lecca

. . . while outerwear was in focus at Coach © Dan Lecca

The week was a reminder of the tactile pleasures of live shows: the fine fabrics and inviting spread of vegetables, bread and cheese served at Gabriela Hearst; the dynamism of a dance performance, performed at Rachel Comey’s wonderful 20th anniversary show; the street market Tory Burch set up near her new store on Mercer Street in Soho, where guests were invited to help themselves to records and books, coffee and pastry, bunches of lavender and potted herbs.

Burch, whose brand has helped carry the torch for classic American sportswear since its founding in 2004, cited the 1940s designer Claire McCardell’s “mix of versatility, function, integrity and joy” as the inspiration for easy, cinched-waist dresses in Madras plaid and broderie anglaise, striped and checked full skirts with deep pockets, and ballet flats that tied at the ankle, done in an offbeat 1970s palette of brown, mustard, navy and acid green.

Voluminous gowns closed the show at Carolina Herrera . . .  © Jonas Gustavsson

. . . and similar volumes were seen at Rodarte © Thomas Concordia

Michael Kors’ spring collection was similarly classic, if a bit unadventurous, with its elegant portrait collar coats and full gingham skirts paired with crops tops and cardigans, shown in the leafy enclaves of Tavern on the Green in Central Park.

“Globally we’re seeing people wanting to show off the body,” Kors said in a collection preview, explaining the bare midriffs. The $3bn-revenue brand has recently gone through a “reset”, pulling back on discounting and focusing on growing categories beyond accessories, outgoing chief executive John Idol said in a recent investors’ call; but if the spring/summer collection is anything to go by, the brand plans to stick to its guns aesthetically.

As does Thom Browne, who returned to New York Fashion Week for one season only. Since the label was acquired by Zegna in 2018 (valuing it at $500m), the brand has gone further upmarket and doubled sales, Gildo Zegna told me in July; that was evident in the beautifully tailored and lightly pinstriped grey wools.

Tom Ford presented silky cargo trousers reminiscent of early 2000s fashion . . .  © Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

. . . and Joseph Altuzarra catered to his customers’ new hybrid working arrangements © Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Joseph Altuzarra also returned from showing in Paris, but his move is permanent — and that is a very good thing. His luxe knit co-ords and easy, slim dresses with their natural dyes, crocheted busts and tasselled belts make sense here — and for his customers’ new hybrid working arrangements. (Tom Ford also addressed the fact that we’re living a greater part of our lives at home, with silky cargo trousers and sequinned tops and basketball shorts that make sense for home entertaining and nights out.)

Because for many, the best thing about American fashion is its simplicity and utility, and designers like Altuzarra, Proenza Schouler and Tory Burch know how to dress busy, intelligent, urban women. As Peter Do, the Vietnamese designer and Phoebe Philo protégé whose tasteful deconstructed trouser suits and slim ribbed-knit tunic dresses made for a very good runway debut, said post-show: “It cannot get anymore American than those pockets in those gowns. There’s pockets in everything. And I appreciate that.”

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The Met Gala Showed Fashion Survived the Pandemic, Insanity Intact

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The Met Gala Showed Fashion Survived the Pandemic, Insanity Intact

The Met Gala staged its in-person return with predictable wow moments, and predictable I-hope-the-stylist-remembered-to-tape-that-strap-firmly moments. The theme was the lexicon of American fashion, per the Met’s big new exhibit. Some people read the invite, some people thought about it, some people addressed it intelligently, others playfully, and others just dressed up and down for the sheer hell of it.

There is certainly a lot of skin on display at the Met this muggy Monday night, barely encased in some very beautiful clothes. Cara Delevingne let her pantsuit top do the talking: it read “Peg the Patriarchy.” And then there is Kim Kardashian, who arrived in New York a few days ago in what looked like a bondage mask.

Tonight—after Lil Nas X had performed a fabulous costume change medley, and Iman showed the meaning of dressing up to anyone who thought something sparkly would suffice—Kim K had to be guided up the steps, all in black head to toe. Maybe this will catch on, and we will soon be wandering the streets not only in masks but utterly encased. Slits for eyes for seeing, slits for noses for breathing, and slits for mouths for eating will be seen as strictly for wimps. What fun we shall have.

Kim Kardashian

Kim Kardashian looked joyous and upbeat in this all-black jumpsuit that covered her full body, complete with a face mask. At least it’s COVID-safe.

Lil Nas X

Lil Nas X performed three costume changes on the carpet: robe, body armor, then bodysuit. Twinkling, thrumming, ruling, with gold. And a divine triumph of the “gay agenda” that he resoundingly trumpeted at the VMAs. He returned to the amazing armor look once inside.

A$AP Rocky and Rihanna

They arrived super-late, photographers came to blows trying to see what the big reveal would be, and there it was. A$AP Rocky wore a colorful blanket we all need to be wrapped up in when times are tough or we have a cold and only Dawson’s Creek reruns on Netflix will do, and Rihanna wore a gorgeous Balenciaga gown. Under that magnificent granny blanket was a sharp tux, by the way. Great. But not show-stopping, and one hopes those photographers are all now having a drink, commiserating over the absurdity of it all.

Faith

THIS is how you dress for the Met Gala. Shimmer, drama, a hat that will repel all unwelcome attention, and welcome all the right kind. Wow, one has to dance in this divine Harris Reed creation.

Debbie Harry

Majestic coolness, and someone who read the invite. Red, white and blue, y’see. Zac Posen designed this, from distressed denim top half to flowing, shredded skirt and fluttering train.

Keke Palmer

One of the night’s first arrivals, Keke Palmer, made a case for ending the night right here and letting us all go home. How could it get better than this shimmering bodycon number straight off the Sergio Hudson spring runway?

Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty

Megan Fox

Last night, her partner Machine Gun Kelly wore a glittering red suit, tonight Megan Fox wore the lady-equivalent from Dundas. It took 50 people to embroider the dress, and had to be ASSEMBLED.

Emily Blunt

Glinda the Good Witch is with us, in Miu Miu. Actually, this is a reference to Hedy Lamarr in Ziegfeld Girl.

Alicia Keys

You won’t find better diamonds in the hair, ever. Crisp and beautiful in white. But the diamonds!

Illana Glazer

Earlier in the night, Illana Glazer posted an Instagram story of her Met Gala prep, which included breast pumping (the Broad City star became a mom in July). “Making milk,” she said. “Met milk.” And then she slipped into this dramatic feathered number hand-sewn by Jason Rembert of Alietté. Cool mom!

Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty

Jennifer Lopez

JLo’s dramatic Wild West Ralph Lauren look imagined a super sexy Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. Americana never looked so good. And neither did the color brown.

Nia Dennis

Gymnast Nia Dennis did a casual backflip on the red carpet in her electric blue catsuit.

Anna Wintour

One of the biggest names in fashion pays homage to an American titan of the industry: Anna Wintour in Oscar de la Renta. “It was the great Oscar de la Renta who brought me to the museum, so I wanted to honor him,” she told Keke Palmer on the red carpet.

Timothée Chalamet

Timothée Chalamet, a co-chair this year, wore white, with dashes of black on the collar to add drama—a short waiter’s jacket, loose-then-tapered trousers, and white sneakers. Some jewels casually on the waist. He really does thoughtfully dress for his gay fanbase, time after time.

Carolyn Maloney

Very few people stick to themes of a Met Gala, at least visibly—so, props for this at least to Dem congresswoman Carolyn Maloney who wore a dress with “Rights for Women” and “ERA Yes,” to signal her desire for the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment.

Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty

Amanda Gorman

Co-chair, poet, and headband queen Amanda Gorman wore a crystal headpiece and sparkling eye makeup to pair with a navy blue gown by ​​Vera Wang. There were 3,000 hand-sewn crystals blazed on the gown, which she told Keke Palmer on the red carpet was a nod to the “Statue of Liberty.” It was a thoughtful outfit: she wore a laurel crown to represent her poetry and toted a clutch that read “Give me your tired.” Gorman said she wanted to celebrate “America welcoming the world.”

Leon Bridges

Leon Bridges told Keke Palmer on the red carpet he did not agree with the “politics” of his home state, Texas, but he was referencing the state with his Bode jacket. The first dose of yeehaw charm from the evening.

Julia Garner

Now this is an outfit that you wear after a year and a half indoors. Julia Garner mixed all the naked trends: see-through, leotard, an ab-slit by the famously American designer Stella McCartney.

Ella Emhoff

Ella Emhoff referenced the great American tradition of… figure skating warm-up practice? The inspiration for her fishnet, rhinestone, fire engine onesie looked like it could have been an ice rink. Either way, the newly-minted model looked very comfortable in Stella McCartney.

Yara Shahidi

Channeled Josephine Baker in custom Dior. Transcendent.

Barbie Ferreira

Dripping in pearls, in a corset dress designed by Jonathan Simkhai. It’s giving me elegant saloon energy, though that purple eyeshadow is all Gen Z.

Pete Davidson

In Thom Browne and a black skirt, the SNL star coyly showed his calves, and called himself a “slutty nun.” He is also wearing jewelry made to honor his firefighter father Scott, and everyone who died on 9/11.

Mj Rodriguez

The brilliant Mj Rodriguez—the standout actor and star of Pose—is wearing gorgeous monochromatic Thom Browne; a collision of modern and old, she said. Her historic Emmy nomination—she is the first trans woman to be nominated for a lead acting Emmy—gave her the opportunity to speak for trans people all over the world, she said.

Brooklyn Beckham and Nicola Peltz

Young love is a beautiful thing, even though if it feels slightly odd, and you very old, when you remember one of its participants as a young boy. Peltz is wearing Valentino.

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Tracee Ellis Ross

Tracee Ellis Ross worked the bathrobe chic trend, nailing that elusive comfortable-but-put-together vibe in a Balenciaga couture number.

Dan Levy

Dressed by Loewe, a David Wojnarowicz artwork, an image of men kissing as a declarative image of queer love and equality: perfect statement dressing. And extremely handsome.

Maisie Williams

Dressed by boyfriend Reuben Selby in this futuristic piece of fabulosity, Williams said this was a tribute to American movie heroines and The Matrix. And that is her hair, not a hat.

Billie Eilish

The black jumper of the VMAs has GONE. Instead, enter the bombshell, with this gorgeous, winning tribute to Marilyn Monroe by Oscar de la Renta. And the likely cause of a thousand falls and trips in the Met, as people try not to step on that train. “I am shivering and shaking,” she said. “I am so excited, and couldn’t be happier.” Apparently, she leveraged her influence to get the designer to stop using fur in his clothing.

Saweetie

One night after killing it in metallics at the VMAs, Saweetie was back in Christian Cowan, wearing a flesh-baring gown that must make her stylist hold their breath. It came with symbolism too: Saweetie said that the dress came draped with tributes to the Black American and Filipino heritage flags.

Naomi Osaka

Naomi Osaka, another co-chair, said her older sister worked with Louis Vuitton to create the look, which represents her background as a Haitian and Japanese American. “Americana means a mix of all cultures,” she told Keke Palmer on the red carpet.

Serena Williams

What’s better than a cape? A feathered cape (duh), says Serena Williams. She threw it over a lace catsuit, which recalled the jumpsuit she wore, and was unfairly fined for, on the tennis court in 2018.

Grimes

An Elon-less Grimes brought a sword to the red carpet, because of course she did. She told Illana Glazer on the red carpet that her look was inspired by the upcoming movie, Dunes.

Russell Westbrook

In classic Ralph Lauren, and stars and stripes for the hair…

Teyana Taylor

Skin, skin, and metallics in this Prabal Gurung dress, inspired by the Venus de Milo.

Megan Thee Stallion

A super cute, if conventional, Coach pinup look from Megan Thee Stallion. It’s very mid-aughts does 1940s retro—cue the Christina Aguilera.

Kim Petras

Kim Petras wore the cool person label of the moment, Collina Strada, to pay her respects to “horse girls.” The designer, Hillary Taymour, also wore a horse around her neck. Both were based on her ponies from childhood, named Justin and Kangaroo. It took four hours for Petras to get ready, probably due to her extra-long braid. Fashion!

Karlie Kloss

Karlie Kloss wore cherry red Carolina Herrera and walked the carpet not with her husband, Jared’s brother Joshua Kushner, but creative director Wes Gordon. It was, overall, fine. It wasn’t a risk or particularly interesting, but its Americana color got the job done. Bonus points for Gordon’s matching, extra-large red lapel rose.

Irina Shayk

Irina Shayk debuted a pixie cut and had some fun with Jeremy Scott in a see-through corset gown with floral appliqués. The naked dress is back, she says!

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Taraji P. Henson

Taraji P. Henson looks ready to dance in a crop top and pants (maybe it’s a jumpsuit?). Whatever it is, I’ll take a seat at her table, please.

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Lorde

Praise the Lorde, who arrived looking like she’s not quite over 2018’s “Heavenly Bodies” theme. Note that the Vogue September issue cover star is wearing flats. We love a comfy queen.

Megan Rapinoe

Megan Rapinoe looked quite star-spangled, and had one of the best accessories of the night: a clutch that read “In Gay We Trust.”

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Precious Lee

Precious Lee’s custom Area ensemble weighs 100 pounds, and the model needed a team of four people to help her get dressed. That sounds cruel and unusual, but she looks fabulous.

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Virgin Abloh

Skirt or suit? Why pick one when you can have both, as Virgil Abloh shows? Bonus points for the rabbit ear hat.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wore a gown that read, “Tax the rich” to an event where seats cost $60,000, because she’s always reading the room. It was designed by Aurora James, the designer behind Brother Vellies who launched the 15 Percent Pledge, where retailers can sign on to dedicate that amount of store shelves to brands led by people of color.

Hailey and Justin Bieber

Hailey wore Yves Saint Laurent and Justin Bieber modeled a new branch of his clothing line, dubbed La Maison Drew. Their basic black ensembles were the bare minimum—snooze.

Gemma Chan

It’s easy to look elegant when you’re Gemma Chan, but this mini dress/train situation takes her effortless chicness to new levels.

Gabrielle Union

Gabrielle Union in Iris Van Herpen is the stuff of Met Gala dreams—you can’t go wrong with this structural beauty.

Taika Waititi and Rita Ora

Can glamor be sexy? Can men and women ever look really, perfectly well matched? Well, yes they can!

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